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I can half understand why we don't say Paree, but why shouldn't English speaking people be able to sort out ... ard' instead of 'Mare lind' (Ok, I can't do Fontanian symbols) and the 'normal' pronunciation of the American company name?

But that would be the "normal" American pronunciation of the company's name. If I were a betting man, I'd place a sizeable wager that most UK employees of HP, say, pronounce their company's name after the UK fashion, by contrast. The same's true in and of multinationals everywhere (I work for one, and even our product names are pronounced differently by employees in different countries). Why on earth should Auntie Beeb do differently, therefore?
I can't find them right now, or I'd post a URL, but I remember once reading the Beeb rules on pronouncing foreign place-names, and they were pragmatic in the extreme. If there's a long-established English name or pronunciation, they tend to use that (eg Pariss instead of Paree, Munich rather than Munchen). Exceptions occur when a major place changes its name (hence Beijin rather than Peking). If there's no such precedent, they tend to go with the local pronunciation.

I seem to recall that there's at least one exception there too, though - when the pronunciation and spelling are at odds to British eyes that no-one's going to recognise one from the other, they may fall back on the way that people expect the name to be pronounced - eg I'm fairly sure I've heard Lodz pronounced "lods", rather than its correct pronunciation (which I think is somewhere closer to "wudj").

Cheers - Ian
I can half understand why we don't say Paree, but ... symbols) and the 'normal' pronunciation of the American company name?

But that would be the "normal" American* pronunciation of the company's name. If I were a betting man, I'd place ... fairly sure I've heard Lodz pronounced "lods", rather than its correct pronunciation (which I *think is somewhere closer to "wudj").

I have noticed a trend, though, to drop time-honoured English versions of some Spanish place names and adopt the local spelling, albeit often woefully mispronounced ("Sevilla" rhyming with "vanilla", for example).(*) I wonder if the same trend is happening with cities in other countries do any Brits now say "Torino" instead of "Turin", for example?
(* Although spelled properly, the weirdest mispronunciation I'm aware of is Ibiza as "eye-beeth-uh", which is the worst of both worlds; even "eye-beezer" is better than that. Why pronounce the "z" a la española if they can't even get the "i" right?)

Ross Howard
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I have noticed a trend, though, to drop time-honoured English versions of some Spanish place names and adopt the local ... trend is happening with cities in other countries do any Brits now say "Torino" instead of "Turin", for example?

Don't know about Brits - it didn't come up while I was over there, unlike certain Swedish names - but last night, during the NBC TV coverage of the Olympic Games opening, the commentater mentioned the coming Winter Games in "Torino".
Fran
I can half understand why we don't say Paree, but why shouldn't English speaking people be able to sort out ... speaking countries? Why do all English people, it seems when I listen to the BBC, pronounce 'Maryland' as 'Mary land'

I can't speak for the English, but most Australians would say "Mary-land" just as it is written, simply because it is not a place that is significant enough or referred to often enough for its local pronunciation to be known, relevant or of any real interest.
I imagine that's also the reason why Americans usually mispronounce "Melbourne" and "Brisbane", and why Americans and Australians struggle with Worcestershire and Leicester.
Don't know about Brits - it didn't come up while I was over there, unlike certain Swedish names

I was about to say that Sven comes up regularly, then realised that that was possibly an unfortunate choice of words in the light of the tabloid media's recent obsessions with his private life. I'm fairly sure I know how to pronounce the man's middle name ("Gör.." as in "yurt"), but I've yet to hear it.
Cheers - Ian
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Don't know about Brits - it didn't come up while I was over there, unlike certain Swedish names

I was about to say that Sven comes up regularly, then realised that that was possibly an unfortunate choice of ... sure I know how to pronounce the man's middle name ("Gör.." as in "yurt"), but I've yet to hear it.

During the week that I spent with my brother, it seemed impossible to get away from it. My brother has satellite TV, and, every time we turned to an English-language news channel, there they all were. I never actually met anyone who thought that Mr Ericsson's sex life was even remotely important to them, or to his job. I met quite a few who thought he was a useless coach/manager or whatever he is, though.

It was a relief to come back to the US.
Fran
When you sing 'The despot's heel is at thy door...' how do you pronounce Maryland then?

Hum a few bars, John, and perhaps I'll remember it. Then I'd be able to tell you.

I thought it was part of Maryland my Maryland but Google tells me otherwise.

John Dean
Oxford
I imagine that's also the reason why Americans usually mispronounce "Melbourne" and "Brisbane"

I think there's another problem with 'Melbourne', since it's actually a pretty important city (though, granted, it's in Australia which is far away).
Even if an American talks about Melbourne a lot (= SAfrE 'alot'), even if an American has lived there, I think they're still going to pronounce it like /mEl ,bOrn/ when speaking with Americans. As I understand it, Australians say /'mEl [email protected]/. But most Americans are rhotic, and so if Americans were to copy the AusE pronunciation they'd say 'Mel-burn', rhotically. But this is quite different in sound from the non-rhotic version. So probably Americans figure they shouldn't bother.
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I have noticed a trend, though, to drop time-honoured English ... any Brits now say "Torino" instead of "Turin", for example?

Don't know about Brits - it didn't come up while I was over there, unlike certain Swedish names - but last night, during the NBC TV coverage of the Olympic Games opening, the commentater mentioned the coming Winter Games in "Torino".

It's becoming the norm. Mainly, I think, because Brits are familiar with a lot of Continental football clubs; holidays must be helping, too, but the travel trade's practice seems to be inconsistent. As we've noticed before, atlases now generally use native spellings.

Mike.
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