1 2 3 4  6 7 8 14
I can half understand why we don't say Paree, but why shouldn't English speaking people be able to sort out ... ard' instead of 'Mare lind' (Ok, I can't do Fontanian symbols) and the 'normal' pronunciation of the American company name?

Just a guess from a foreigner's point of view: one of the reasons might be that the correspondence of letters to sounds is - ehm - not too close in English. Neither in British nor in American English. Maybe the few rules (if there are any) for pronunciation of written text are even different between US and UK? Or, IOW, why dont you write "Marelind" if this is the pronunciation?
Diedrich

pgp-Key (RSA) 1024/09B8C0BD
fingerprint = 2C 49 FF B2 C4 66 2D 93 6F A1 FF 10 16 59 96 F3 HTML-Mail wird ungelesen entsorgt.
I imagine that's also the reason why Americans usually mispronounce "Melbourne" and "Brisbane"

I think there's another problem with 'Melbourne', since it's actually a pretty important city (though, granted, it's in Australia which ... 'Mel-burn', rhotically. But this is quite different in sound from the non-rhotic version. So probably Americans figure they shouldn't bother.

Tossing in Melbourne, Florida, which is pronounced /mEl ,bOrn/ . If one is Floridian, it's a well-known, if not important, city.

Nell
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
I think there's another problem with 'Melbourne', since it's actually ... the non-rhotic version. So probably Americans figure they shouldn't bother.

Tossing in Melbourne, Florida, which is pronounced /mEl ,bOrn/ . If one is Floridian, it's a well-known, if not important, city.

That's true even for me, an ex-Floridian, who lived just a few miles from Melbourne, and who still has friends there.

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
a former Merritt Islander
Tossing in Melbourne, Florida, which is pronounced /mEl ,bOrn/ .If one is Floridian, it's a well-known, if not important, city.

Does this mean that Melbourne, FL, is accented on the last (second) syllable? If so, I've been saying it wrong for quite some time. As far as I recall, I've never heard it pronounced, correctly or otherwise, on TV. In fact, there's a chance that I've never heard it pronounced, period. Australia *or* Florida. (I pronounce both the same.)
Maria Conlon
/If all is not lost, where is it/?
Just a guess from a foreigner's point of view: one of the reasons might be that the correspondence of letters ... text are even different between US and UK? Or, IOW, why dont you write "Marelind" if this is the pronunciation?

Oy! It's not! It's "Merralind"!
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I assure you that our version is not pronounced the same. It is only and always MEL-buhn.
We don't want none of your stinkin' r's around here.
Just a guess from a foreigner's point of view: one ... why dont you write "Marelind" if this is the pronunciation?

Oy! It's not! It's "Merralind"!

It is also Marelind and even Marelin for those in a hurry. Compare with Baltimore, a name which often gets grotesquely shortened, especially by the locals.

Charles Riggs
I have noticed a trend, though, to drop time-honoured English versions of some Spanish place names and adopt the local ... trend is happening with cities in other countries do any Brits now say "Torino" instead of "Turin", for example?

Not heard that myself, but "Livorno" seems to be taking over from "Leghorn". And today I heard a BBC reporter pronounce the French town Lourdes without the final "s".
John in Wales
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I have noticed a trend, though, to drop time-honoured English ... any Brits now say "Torino" instead of "Turin", for example?

Don't know about Brits - it didn't come up while I was over there, unlike certain Swedish names - but last night, during the NBC TV coverage of the Olympic Games opening, the commentater mentioned the coming Winter Games in "Torino". Fran

This isn't versions of time honored Spanish place names but are examples of what can happen with an English speaking person gets hold of Spanish words as used as place names. I have California especially in mind. Los Angeles is lahsannjellus except when a former mayor pronounced it lahsanggless. The street I grew up on was named Lucia but barbarised by the residents as loo-sha, this resident included.

My goodness, we not only murder the mother tongue but do a pretty good number on other languages.
I'm more aware of correct Spanish pronunciations (although I pronounce Los Angeles the same as most Americans) ever since I had a Latin lover. Not a lover of Latin. We're the parents of twin girls (twins are considered lucky by Mexicans; just an aside). His parent tongue is Spanish so I get a little self-conscious when I mis-pronounce Spanish words. I've also done the unforgivable translated idioms word for word. I have a memory of one argument in particular that resulted. He thought I was insulting him and I was just being playful. Oops. Mexicans are over-senstive anyway (like I'm not thin-skinned myelf; yeah, right). Couples have enough misunderstandings and quite a few of ours have stemmed from really misunderstanding.
Nell
Show more