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This isn't versions of time honored Spanish place names but are examples of what can happen with an English speaking ... place names. I have California especially in mind. Los Angeles is lahsannjellus except when a former mayor pronounced it lahsanggless.

In the UK it seems to be generally pronounced something like "lossannjuhleeze".
John in Wales
Ann Elk's dinosaur premed:
I can half understand why we don't say Paree, but ... I listen to the BBC, pronounce 'Maryland' as 'Mary land'

I can't speak for the English, but most Australians would say "Mary-land" just as it is written, simply because it ... also the reason why Americans usually mispronounce "Melbourne" and "Brisbane", and why Americans and Australians struggle with Worcestershire and Leicester.

You've just reminded me of a visiting American who broke his long stay in Australia with a short trip to New Zealand. He told us he was going to visit "Doon-din". None of us had ever heard of the place. It finally clicked when he wrote it down: Dunedin.

Peter Moylan peter at ee dot newcastle dot edu dot au http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Areff premed:
Just a guess from a foreigner's point of view: one ... why dont you write "Marelind" if this is the pronunciation?

Oy! It's not! It's "Merralind"!

I've heard it pronounced "Merr", followed by some mouth movements that don't produce any noticeable sound. You can almost see the word being swallowed.

Peter Moylan peter at ee dot newcastle dot edu dot au http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)
JohnJ filted:
In the UK it seems to be generally pronounced something like "lossannjuhleeze".

I sense the influence of Arlo Guthrie..r
}> 'Hewlett PACK ard' though is what I've always assumed to be }> correct. What exactly *is* "the 'normal' pronunciation ... 'Hewlett }> Pack'rd' ? } } /[email protected] 'p&kRd/ or /eItS pi/. Or /di: waI/ for those that have the laptops.

A curiosity:
The Model DY-2500 was the first production instrument made by Dynac, which was formed as an independent company in 1956 to concentrate on the increasing demand for special purpose systems composed of standard "building block" instruments. It was then believed that these special jobs could better be performed for the time being by an organization separate from HP. An early "spin-off," the company was financed in part by HP and HP employees and in part by some of Dynac's early employees. HP served as a principal source of supply for instruments used in the complete systems designed by Dynac.
The name "Dynac" was derived from the Hewlett-Packard logo in order to associate its products with the quality engineering and production of HP. The HP symbol, "hp," was inverted to create the logo, "dy." Dynac was changed to Dymec in 1958 to avoid conflict with an existing trademark.
Eventually, the growth in demand for complete electronic systems and special purpose electronic instruments exceeded expectations and placed severe strain upon the limited financial resources of Dymec. Because of the close relations between Dymec and HP and the complementary nature of their products, Dymec was merged into HP as the Dymec division in 1959.
http://tinyurl.com/4p6mf

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >Feeling good about government is like
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >looking on the bright side of anyPalo Alto, CA 94304 >catastrophe. When you quit looking

http://www.kirshenbaum.net /
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I can half understand why we don't say Paree, but ... symbols) and the 'normal' pronunciation of the American company name?

But that would be the "normal" American pronunciation of the company's name. If I were a betting man, I'd place a sizeable wager that most UK employees of HP, say, pronounce their company's name after the UK fashion, by contrast.

You'd be right, in my experience.
The same's true in and of multinationals everywhere (I work for one, and even our product names are pronounced differently by employees in different countries). Why on earth should Auntie Beeb do differently, therefore?

It seems just a bit stranger in the case of HP, because it's not simply a case of a common word pronounced differently in different places (like "Jaguar"), but rather somebody's name. Doesn't the BBC try to get people's names reasonably correct? When they reported on "David Packard of Hewlett-Packard", how did they do it?

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >Now every hacker knows
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 > That the secret to survivin'Palo Alto, CA 94304 >Is knowin' when the time is free
Packard is not an exclusively American name, so you would expect the 'normal' local pronunciation of that name. If someone's personal way of saying his/her name is wildly different from the norm (eg those Gillians who insist on a hard G), people may remember it, but when it just sounds like a dialect difference that can also be heard in other words, people tend to ignore it.

Rob Bannister
When you sing 'The despot's heel is at thy door...' how do you pronounce Maryland then?

"On thy shore," not "at thy door." His torch is at thy temple door.

You must be from among the Northern Scum mentioned in the last verse.

\\P. Schultz
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I imagine that's also the reason why Americans usually mispronounce "Melbourne" and "Brisbane",

and Cans. (Spelled Cairns).
\\P. Schultz
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