I can half understand why we don't say Paree, but why shouldn't English speaking people be able to sort out the local pronunciations of proper nouns in English speaking countries? Why do all English people, it seems when I listen to the BBC, pronounce 'Maryland' as 'Mary land' and 'Hewlett Packard' as 'Hewlett PACK ard' instead of 'Mare lind' (Ok, I can't do Fontanian symbols) and the 'normal' pronunciation of the American company name?

Charles Riggs
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I can half understand why we don't say Paree, but why shouldn't English speaking people be able to sort out ... ard' instead of 'Mare lind' (Ok, I can't do Fontanian symbols) and the 'normal' pronunciation of the American company name?

I've never noticed 'Mary land' on the BBC. I think I pronounce it correctly, but then I have family there.
'Hewlett PACK ard' though is what I've always assumed to be correct. What exactly *is* "the 'normal' pronunciation of the American company name?" I'm guessing something like 'Hewlett Pack'rd' ?
I think the Anglo/non-Anglo placename stuff ('Paris'/'Paree') is a different thing entirely: 'London'/'Londres', 'Munich'/'Munchen', 'Prague'/'Praha', 'Spain'/'Espana' - the list is endless, and I think we should at least spell places as the natives do, even if we can't pronounce them.

Of course, the BBC does occasionally have little outbursts of overhauling their placename pronunciations. Kabul suddenly switched from 'Ka-BULL' to 'Karble', 'Peking' became 'Beijing' and 'Bombay' - 'Mumbai'. They're an odd bunch, and no mistake.
Mike M
I can half understand why we don't say Paree, but why shouldn't English speaking people be able to sort out ... as 'Mary land' and 'Hewlett Packard' as 'Hewlett PACK ard' instead of 'Mare lind' (Ok, I can't do Fontanian symbols)

Say what? In New York we pronounce "Maryland" as though it were written "Merralind" /[email protected]@nd/ "merry" vowel in the first syllable and schwa in the second. Three syllables.
Now, granted, most Americans have no Mary/merry distinction, and some, like Sparky and erk, go so far as to include marry in the mix. But until now I hadn't thought that some Americans pronounce "Maryland" as a two-syllable word, "mare-lind".
and the 'normal' pronunciation of the American company name?

They really get "Packard" wrong? That surprises me. Erk can set them straight WABTB.
I've also heard BBC folks pronounce "Michigan" with the first syllable like "Mitch".
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'Hewlett PACK ard' though is what I've always assumed to be correct. What exactly *is* "the 'normal' pronunciation of the American company name?" I'm guessing something like 'Hewlett Pack'rd' ?

/[email protected] 'p&kRd/ or /eItS pi/.
'Hewlett PACK ard' though is what I've always assumed to be correct. What exactly *is* "the 'normal' pronunciation of the American company name?" I'm guessing something like 'Hewlett Pack'rd' ?

I don't get around enough to know what is "normal", but what I hear is "Packerd". There is a slight emphasis on the "pack", but the word is spoken without a break between "pack" and "erd". I wouldn't put a hyphen in it to represent the spoken word.
Your "pack'rd" is probably the same as my "packerd".
'Hewlett PACK ard' though is what I've always assumed to ... the American company name?"I'm guessing something like 'Hewlett Pack'rd' ?

/[email protected] 'p&kRd/ or /eItS pi/.

Sorry, I don't speak phonetic.
(Yeah, yeah, I know, I know).
Mike M
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What I'm

/[email protected] 'p&kRd/ or /eItS pi/.

Sorry, I don't speak phonetic. (Yeah, yeah, I know, I know).

Stumped by symbols? Hopeless at hieroglyphs? When ASCII IPA let's you down, new, improved Rhyme-o-Matic Classic (TM) never fails!

(Mike, the difference is just that Americans pronounce Packard to rhyme with "knackered".)

Ross Howard
When ASCII IPA let's you down

(Ou'ch.)

Ross Howard
What I'm Sorry, I don't speak phonetic. (Yeah, yeah, I know, I know).

Stumped by symbols? Hopeless at hieroglyphs? When ASCII IPA let's you down, new, improved Rhyme-o-Matic Classic (TM) never fails! (Mike, the difference is just that Americans pronounce Packard to rhyme with "knackered".)

They do... so how is "Packard" (which looks Anglo-Britic enough) pronounced in BrE? Surely not like "picard" or something of that sort?
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