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Maybe Shakespeare gave up on the thing and said, "Here thou goest, Thomas, me old China. I can't do anything with this piece of ***. Use it in good health."

Now that's the most plausible explanation so far.
Bert
"Paulo Joe Jingy"
"Plagiarism-detection software was created with lazy, sneaky college students in mind - not the likes of William Shakespeare.

Can you de-plagiarise THIS, you sneaky software?
The curfew tolls the knell of parting day;
"To be, or not to be," it seems to say.
Outrageous fortune slings an arrow keen,
And leaves the world to darkness. What's it mean?

Martin B
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I think I'm just resistant to this sort of literary analysis, especially where computers are involved. Besides, everyone knows it was Queen Elizabeth the First, anyway.

I understand what you're saying. Now someone will scan in all of Shakespeare's writing, distill it, put it in a program and teach everyone the key to writing great plays in ten simple steps.

And Queen Elizabeth the First is so last decade. I think they're saying he was the ghost of her cat now.
"To purr, or not to purr: that is the question:"

Paulo Joe Jingy
"I just couldn't live in a world without me."
I think I'm just resistant to this sort of literary analysis, especially where computers are involved. Besides, everyone knows it was Queen Elizabeth the First, anyway.

I understand what you're saying. Now someone will scan in all of Shakespeare's writing, distill it, put it in a program and teach everyone the key to writing great plays in ten simple steps.

And Queen Elizabeth the First is so last decade. I think they're saying he was the ghost of her cat now.
"To purr, or not to purr: that is the question:"

Paulo Joe Jingy
"I just couldn't live in a world without me."