TIME magazine
http://news.yahoo.com/s/time/20091020/us time/08599193097100

"Plagiarism-detection software was created with lazy, sneaky college students in mind - not the likes of William Shakespeare. Yet the software may have settled a centuries-old mystery over the authorship of an unattributed play from the late 1500s called The Reign of Edward III. Literature scholars have long debated whether the play was written by Shakespeare - some bits are incredibly Bard-like, but others don't resemble his style at all. The verdict, according to one expert: the play is likely a collaboration between Shakespeare and Thomas Kyd, another popular playwright of his time."

Paulo Joe Jingy
"I just couldn't live in a world without me."
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The trouble with that approach is that it can't distinguish between bits genuinely writ by old Will and bits penned by someone else deliberately aping his style and using (as the chap behind this freely admits) entire phrases from known Shakespeare plays.
Bert
The trouble with that approach is that it can't distinguish between bits genuinely writ by old Will and bits penned by someone else deliberately aping his style and using (as the chap behind this freely admits) entire phrases from known Shakespeare plays. Bert

You might want to actually read the article, which you did not.
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The trouble with that approach is that it can't distinguish between bits genuinely writ by old Will and bits penned by someone else deliberately aping his style and using (as the chap behind this freely admits) entire phrases from known Shakespeare plays. Bert

You might want to actually read the article, which you did not.
The trouble with that approach is that it can't distinguish between bits genuinely writ by old Will and bits penned by someone else deliberately aping his style and using (as the chap behind this freely admits) entire phrases from known Shakespeare plays. Bert

You might want to actually read the article, which you did not.
The trouble with that approach is that it can't distinguish between bits genuinely writ by old Will and bits penned by someone else deliberately aping his style and using (as the chap behind this freely admits) entire phrases from known Shakespeare plays. Bert

You might want to actually read the article, which you did not.
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The trouble with that approach is that it can't distinguish between bits genuinely writ by old Will and bits penned by someone else deliberately aping his style and using (as the chap behind this freely admits) entire phrases from known Shakespeare plays. Bert

You might want to actually read the article, which you did not.
Art forgeries are easy to distinguish, because scientists can look at the original stroke pattern to see whether they are fluid or deliberate. The forger would be a careful imitation, while the original artist would have a freer stroke.
The trouble with that approach is that it can't distinguish between bits genuinely writ by old Will and bits penned by someone else deliberately aping his style and using (as the chap behind this freely admits) entire phrases from known Shakespeare plays.

But he breaks it down to Shakespeare writing 40% and Thomas Kyd writing 60%. A collaboration that no author took credit for. Shakespeare was well known at the time but Thomas Kyd wasn't, and the he gets a just as strong a match on Thomas Kyd as he does on Shakespeare.

"So why would the Bard, at this stage in his career - age 32 and well established by the time Edward III was published in 1596 - need to collaborate on a play? Simply because, as literature scholars have documented, the London theaters of the day were competing for audiences and had to churn out material as quickly as possible to stay ahead of one another. To do so, they often used groups of authors to write playbooks in a matter of weeks, paying each author by the scene. The theater companies would then often advertise themselves, rather than the authors, on the published playbooks.
'In Edward III, it's quite a typical arrangement; Shakespeare writes three scenes near the beginning and one later on, presumably to guarantee some kind of continuity," says Vickers. "It's a very good play, but it suffers from some inconsistencies - characters who appear in some of Shakespeare's scenes don't appear later on.'"

It seems unlikely that someone else would fake both Shakespeare and Thomas Kyd, together, for the same play, unless it was Thomas Kyd himself. But, then, why wouldn't he fake the whole thing?

Paulo Joe Jingy
"I just couldn't live in a world without me."
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