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Does "play" in the following context mean "game and wordplay, i.e. Freud plays with words"?


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Uncanny sensations are triggered in the present by the creepy evocation of a past that the subject has repressed, a past that should have been over and done with, but which comes back to haunt the subject, making time and space seem out of joint. The ambivalent nature of the uncanny can be seen in the tripartite linguistic play that Freud delineates in his essay. The uncanny is translated in German as unheimlich, unhomely, which is the opposite of heimlich, often translated as homely. Freud traces the etymology of the word heimlich using various dictionaries to show how unheimlich is embedded in its seeming opposite, so much so that ‘[h]eimlich…becomes increasingly ambivalent, until it finally merges with its antonym, unheimlich.
Comments  
cattttDoes "play" in the following context mean "game and wordplay, i.e. Freud plays with words"?

It is unclear. The writer says that Freud delineates, or describes, the play, not that he himself plays with anything, but goes on to say how he manipulates the etymology of a word, which seems like a sort of wordplay. And "tripartite" is meaningless to anyone who, like me, has not read "The Uncanny".