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So it's common to find a sentence like this:

It's fun for me to play tennis.
OR
Playing tennis is fun for me.

But can we replace the word "fun" with "pleasant"?

To me, it sounds wierd.

Playing tennis is pleasant for me.

It's pleasant for me to play tennis.

Maybe you can tell me how the word pleasant is used, in contrast to how fun is used. Maybe telling me what contexts the word "pleasant" is used would help me understand.

Pleasantly yours,

beanbag
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pleasant is okay; it's just not as intensely pleasurable as fun! Emotion: smile

pleasant is also used in contexts where fun is not used. fun is usually restricted to activities (like playing tennis); pleasant is not. nice is similar to pleasant, but even more bland and inactive.

The weather is quite [pleasant / nice / *fun] today.
Although we had a terrible argument last week, we had a rather [pleasant / nice / *fun] conversation today. I suspect all is forgiven.


CJ
Comments  
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CalifJim pleasant is also used in contexts where fun is not used. 
Oh, so this means that wherever the word Pleasant is appropriate, the word fun isn't. and vice versa. Correct? When I think of "pleasant", I think of someone intending to say that is wasn't unpleasant.
Your post came out all screwy for some reason. I can't read it. I'm guessing what you are asking.
The asterisk (*) always indicates an incorrect choice or something ungrammatical.

CJ
[5]
califjim,
the codey part was supposed to be a snipped quote. You said "pleasant is also used in contexts where fun is not used. "

Does this mean that wherever the word Pleasant is appropriate, the word fun isn't. and vice versa. Correct?
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No. It means that pleasant is used in contexts where fun is used (such as in the examples you posted at the very beginning of the thread) and is also used in contexts where fun is not used.

CJ
[2]