+0
I got confused sometimes about this sentence. How should I describe the situation in my composition?

Which one is right?

(1) I told him that if he could come to our country, I would be happy.

(2) I told him if he come to our country, I will be happy.

The fact is that I am not sure whether he'll come or not. But, at least one I can be sure, I'll look forward his coming with eager anticipation. How should I make somebody else know the situation I describe? Can I omit the word "that" in the sentence?

The other question is the past tense, here is the article I wrote to another person.

"I told Peter that Taiwan and were not the same country. Taiwan was an island beside . a beautiful isaland with warm climate, magnificent scenery and friendly people."

So my question is that Taiwan is a island. That's a truth. It won't change over time. Should I replace " the past tense " it to " the present tense" ?

"I told Peter that Taiwan and are not the same country. Taiwan is an island beside . a beautiful isaland with warm climate, magnificent scenery and friendly people."

I'll appreciate it if someone can help me through this.

1 2
Comments  
For the past tense, see my quotations from Jespersen in this thread:

sequence of tenses
There are some problems in the link... Can you tell me what key word I can search for?

And thank you for your help.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Fixed, sorry.
Is there anyone can help me about first problem? Chould I omit the "that" or not?
[That] functions as a separator in this context. I prefer to see it for I think it works better with it. However, some people leave it out.

John said [that] Mary is coming to Paul’s birthday party.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Oops, I am so sorry. I didn't explain my question clearly.

My point is - if I omit the "that" in the sentence in my article, might someone misunderstand the meaning of sentence?

(1) I told him that if he could come to our country, I would be happy.
---> considering the meaning of this sentence: I told him that --- I would be happy if he could come to our country.

(2) I told him if he comes to our country, I will be happy.
---> considering the meaning of this sentence: if he comes to our country, I will tell him somthing. And the result is that I am happy.

Please forgive the poor explanation of my question. Thank you for your answer anyway.
I think you need that in both 1 and 2.
But I don't think 2 is correct in terms of verbs.
When we use [if] in a context, we need to be careful how we apply the verbs because of the conditional implications.

A- I told John on the phone that I would be so thrilled if he could come to visit us this summer.

B- So did he say he would come?

A- He won’t know until after the final.

Two points in this context I want to make.

1) [that] is needed because you want to separate what you told John from what you are telling B.

2 )Because of the hypothetical condition, the past form of the aux. word should be used.

Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Show more