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Hello teachers,

Could you please check these sentences. I wonder whether the usage of articles are correct.

"I'm going to talk about a global citizen. A global citizen is the one who is aware of his community ~."


Thank you very much

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"I'm going to talk about a global citizen. A global citizen is the one who is aware of his their community."

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Thank you very much.

Clive"I'm going to talk about a global citizen. A global citizen is the one who is aware of his their community."

Sorry, there is something I still wonder about. In the beginning of the second sentence, it's used a singular form"A global citizen". So, why did you use "their" instead of "his" in the second part of the sentence?

Knowing that a "global citizen" has a plural noun "global citizens".



Thank you

If you just say 'his', are you implying that women are not global citizens?

If you say 'his or her', it seems cumbersome, so we commonly say 'their'.

Clive

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I understand your correction now. Thank you.

I just want to tell you something regarding this topic. In my language and even in English, as I once read online (not from a book) , usually when we use the terms "one, someone, somebody, person, human", these terms themselves include male and female. And we use "his" with them; using "his" would still include females.

What I'm trying to say is that the "his" when it comes with these words above would still definitely include males and females, while using "her" will JUST refers to female. So, I can say that "his" is more general in comparison to "her" that is just specific to females.

For instance:

1- "If someone breaks rules, he will be responsible of his behavior."

Although, some times I could write "If someone breaks rules, he/she will be responsible of his/her behavior." But it's not necessary as I know or it's cumbersome as you mentioned. So, it doesn't matter that we use "his" as long as using "someone" itself would already include both of the genders.


2- "If a man breaks rules, he will be responsible of his behavior.

This will just refer to males. Any man will be included, but not women.



I just want to make sure whether my usage above is unusual or uncommon in English so that I should avoid it.

It's true that in some cases 'his 'has traditionally referred to both men and women.

However, many women have been objecting to this for a long time, and today careful writers usually try to avoid this use of 'his'. If you are interested in more detail, look up the term 'feminism'. This is a broad movement that is concerned with all kinds of equal treatment for women. Issues of grammar and just one small part of this.

Clive