Task: The first chart below shows the results of a survey which sampled a cross-section of 100,000 people asking if they traveled abroad and why they traveled for the period 1994-98. The second chart shows their destinations over the same period.

The table illustrates the reasons why people living in the UK traveled overseas between 1994 and 1998, whereas the bar chart shows the regions they choose to visit during this period. Both the table and the chart are based on a survey of 100000 people.

Overall, holiday travel was by far the most popular reason for going abroad each year, while the total number of overseas trips increased over the period. By a large margin, the preferred travel destination was Western Europe, which increased in popularity as travel to North America and other regions remained relatively low.

In 1994, 15246 people surveyed traveled abroad on holiday, rising to 20700 in 1998, In contrast, only 3957 people traveled for business in the same year, followed by 3181 people who visit family and friends. The total number of visits increased from 22072 in 1994 to 28828 in 1998. However, the number traveling for ‘other reasons’ stayed fairly constant at around 900 people.

Visits to the most popular destination, Western Europe, increased significantly from just under 20000 in 1994 to slightly below 25000 four years later. Conseverly, far fewer people traveled to other areas and North America. In 1998, the figures were approximately 2400 and 2300 people respectively, with visits to these regions having experienced relatively little growth over the period.

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The table illustrates the reasons why people living in the UK traveled overseas between 1994 and 1998, (That is not the content of the table. What is actually in the cells of the table? ) whereas the bar chart shows the regions they choose to visit during this period. Both the table and the chart are based on a survey of 100000 people. (Your paragraph is incomplete. It does not mention the number and names of the regions, nor does it tell the reader how many categories of reasons are presented.)


Model:

The table and bar chart give information about overseas travel by people living in the UK for each year between 1994 and 1998, based on a survey of a hundred thousand people. Specifically, the table lists the number of travelers by reason of travel (holiday, business, family visits and other), and the bar chart the number who went to each of three regions: Western Europe, North America and other places.


Overall, holiday travel was by far the most popular reason for going abroad each year, while the total number of overseas trips increased over the period. By a large margin, the preferred travel destination was Western Europe, which increased in popularity as travel to North America and other regions remained relatively low.

In 1994, 15246 people surveyed traveled abroad on holiday, rising to 20700 in 1998, In contrast, only 3957 people traveled for business in the same year, followed by 3181 people who visit family and friends. The total number of visits increased from 22072 in 1994 to 28828 in 1998. However, the number traveling for ‘other reasons’ stayed fairly constant at around 900 people.

Visits to the most popular destination, Western Europe, increased significantly from just under 20000 in 1994 to slightly below 25000 four years later. Conseverly, far fewer people traveled to other areas and North America. In 1998, the figures numbers were approximately 2400 and 2300 people respectively, with visits to these regions having experienced relatively little growth over the period.

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