More and more young people from wealthy countries are spending a short time doing unpaid work such as teaching or building houses for communities in poorer countries. Why young people choose to do so? Who will benefit more: young people or the communities?

Nowadays, many young people from developed nations have a tendency to move to low-income countries to participate in voluntary work. In my opinion, there are a number of reasons behind this tendency, and it is equally beneficial to both volunteers and communities.

There are two main reasons why a growing number of young people from rich countries decide to volunteer to aid locals in underdeveloped countries. First, this trend stems from humanity. Feeling sympathy for those who need help such as homeless children or victims of natural disasters, many young people want to help them to overcome difficulties. For example, there are a lot of young volunteers from all over the world have been doing charity work to support the local inhabitants in poor African countries annually. Second, many young people would like to hone social skills, which could make a contribution to their future success. By attending voluntary organizations to assist communities in deprived regions, they might develop soft skills like interpersonal skills or teamwork skills as well as discover new things such as culture or life of locals in different nations where they never go before.

I believe that doing unpaid work such as teaching or building houses for communities in third world countries has benefits to not only young volunteers not also communities. Regarding volunteers, they usually have unforgettable and valuable experiences and salutary lessons from real life, this helping them to have advantages over those who rarely attend volunteer activities. For example, volunteer work abroad will give he or she valuable and unusual experience to add to his or her CV or resume helping him or her stand out from the crowd. In regard to communities, they are also given practical benefits such as food, money, education and healthcare services from voluntary activities. For instance, they could be learned about knowledge related to health care from oversea volunteers, which might help them to prevent some common diseases. As a result, the quality of life of locals could be improved afterward.

In conclusion, young overseas volunteers tend to attend unpaid work in impoverished countries because of several reasons, and this action has been bringing about equally positive effects on locals as well as volunteers.

Nowadays, many young people from developed nations have a tendency to move to low-income countries to participate in voluntary work. In my opinion, there are a number of reasons behind this tendency, and it is equally beneficial to both volunteers and communities.

There are two main reasons why a growing number of young people from rich countries decide to volunteer to aid locals in underdeveloped countries. First, this trend stems from humanity. Feeling sympathy for those who need help, (comma) such as homeless children or victims of natural disasters, many young people want to help them to overcome difficulties. For example, there are a lot of young volunteers from all over the world have been doing charity work (ungrammatical clause structure) to support the local inhabitants in poor African countries annually. Second, many young people would like to hone their social skills, which could make a contribution to their future success. By attending joining voluntary organizations to assist communities in deprived regions, they might develop soft skills like interpersonal skills or teamwork skills as well as discover new things such as culture or life of locals in different nations where they never go (wrong verb form) before.

I believe that doing unpaid work such as teaching or building houses for communities in third world countries has benefits for to not only young volunteers not also communities. Regarding volunteers, they usually have unforgettable and valuable experiences and salutary lessons from real life, this helping (wrong verb form) them to have advantages over those who rarely do attend volunteer activities. For example, volunteer work abroad will give them he or she (wrong form) valuable and unusual experiences to add to their his or her CV or resume, (comma) helping him or her stand out from the crowd. In regard to communities, they are also given practical benefits such as food, money, education and healthcare services from voluntary activities. For instance, they could be learned about knowledge (wrong verb form, wrong expression) related to health care from oversea volunteers, which might help them to prevent some common diseases. As a result, the quality of life of locals could be improved afterward.

In conclusion, young overseas volunteers tend to do attend unpaid work in impoverished countries because of several reasons, and this action has been bringing about equally positive effects to on locals as well as volunteers.