The pie charts below show electricity generation by source in New Zealand and Germany in 1980 and 2010. Summarize the information by selecting and reporting the main features, and make comparisons where relevant.

The pie charts compare New Zealand and Germany in terms of the sources of electricity between 1980 and 2010.

Overall, the total unit of sources in 2010 was almost double that in 1980 in both nations. In 2010, most electricity was produced by nuclear power in Germany and by coal in New Zealand.

In 1980, coal was the main source of electricity in New Zealand, which was twice the figure for Germany with 28 units. By contrast, the electricity generated by petroleum was 22 units in Germany and 11 units in New Zealand. While hydro and natural gas each accounted for 30 units in New Zealand, the figure for natural gas, nuclear and hydropower in Germany were 28 units, 20 units, and only 7 units respectively.

In 2010, there were two principal sources of electricity production in New Zealand, coal (150 units) and hydro (46 units). Natural gas and petroleum totaled almost 5 units. Meanwhile, the main source of electricity production in Germany was nuclear which generated 155 units. Although the figures for natural gas and hydro fell to only 2 units, that for petroleum increased to 27 units. The figure for coal was a significant remain with 28 units.

I don't know where the data comes from, but it is in direct contradiction to the data on Wikipedia, which shows that in New Zealand electricity generation is well over 60% from hyrdro-power.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electricity_sector_in_New_Zealand

By the way, in reality, nuclear power currently accounts for only 11.6% of electricity generated in Germany, but 71.6% in France. At the same time, coal accounts for more than 65% of total energy consumption in China. So the data on these pie charts is totally misleading, fake, and erroneous. Furthermore, to make a valid comparison of units between countries, the data would need to show per capita consumption. As it stands, people in NZ consume far more electricity per person, than in Germany. However, in IELTS Task 1 we do not comment on the accuracy or otherwise of the statistics, or provide any opinion.

perfume56pie charts compare New Zealand and Germany

No, they do not. If you choose to compare them, be careful. Any comparison of the units would in reality be misleading as Germany has a population of around eighty million people, and New Zealand just over four, plus thirty-two million sheep and several million cattle. Unfortunately, the unit measures on the diagrams are not stated, so we do not know if they are gigawatt-hours or what.

perfume56the total unit of sources

I presume this actually refers to the total units generated, which would normally be stated in gigawatt-hours.

perfume56In 1980, coal was the main source of electricity in New Zealand, which was twice the figure for Germany with 28 units.

True, but hardly a useful comparison. The pie charts are misleading as the ones for NZ should be twenty times smaller than those for Germany, taking into account the relative population size.

perfume56the figure for natural gas, nuclear and hydropower in Germany were 28 units, 20 units, and only 7 units

the comparable figures .... were....

perfume56The figure for coal was a significant remain with 28 units.

Significantly, the units sourced from coal remained at 28.

I would suggest that for practice purposes, it is better to stick to genuine IELTS past papers, rather than made-up ones.

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Well thank you for sharing. I don't know ,neither.I am practising task 1 of the ielts test so I found it in the image sector of Google and try to write.

Please look at it again. Does it make sense? Thank you for your consideration.

The pie charts compare the units of electricity produced in New Zealand and Germany between two specific years: 1980 and 2010 from 5 sources shown.

Overall, the the total units generated of sources in 2010 was almost double that in 1980 in both nations. In 2010, most electricity was produced by nuclear power in Germany and by coal in New Zealand.

In 1980, coal was the main source of electricity in New Zealand, which was twice the figure for Germany. By contrast, the electricity generated by petroleum was 22 units in Germany and 11 units in New Zealand. While hydro and natural gas each accounted for 30 units in New Zealand, the comparable figures for natural gas, nuclear and hydropower in Germany were 28 units, 20 units, and only 7 units respectively.

In 2010, there were two principal sources of electricity production in New Zealand, coal (150 units) and hydro (46 units). Natural gas and petroleum totaled almost 5 units. Meanwhile, the main source of electricity production in Germany was nuclear which generated 155 units. Although the figures for natural gas and hydro fell to only 2 units, that for petroleum increased to 27 units. Significantly, the units sourced from coal remained at 28.

perfume56between two specific years: 1980 and 2010 from 5 sources shown.

for two specific years: 1980 and 2010, with a breakdown showing the five sources, coal, petroleum, natural gas, nuclear, and hydro.

perfume56the total units generated of sources in 2010

the total units generated in 2010

perfume56most electricity

the bulk of electricity = more than 50%

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=the+bulk+of+electricity%2Cmost+electricity%2C + +of+electricity&year_start=1960&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Cthe%20bulk%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cmost%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B.t2%3B%2C%2A%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Buse%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bgeneration%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bquantity%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bsupply%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bamount%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bproduction%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bcost%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bflow%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bconsumption%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bconductor%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0#t1%3B%2Cthe%20bulk%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cmost%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B.t2%3B%2C%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Buse%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bgeneration%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bquantity%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bsupply%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bamount%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bproduction%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bcost%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bflow%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bconsumption%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bconductor%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0

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perfume56between two specific years: 1980 and 2010 from 5 sources shown.

for two specific years: 1980 and 2010, with a breakdown showing the five sources, coal, petroleum, natural gas, nuclear, and hydro.

perfume56the total units generated of sources in 2010

the total units generated in 2010

perfume56most electricity

the bulk of electricity = more than 50%

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=the+bulk+of+electricity%2Cmost+electricity%2C + +of+electricity&year_start=1960&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Cthe%20bulk%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cmost%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B.t2%3B%2C%2A%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Buse%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bgeneration%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bquantity%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bsupply%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bamount%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bproduction%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bcost%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bflow%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bconsumption%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bconductor%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0#t1%3B%2Cthe%20bulk%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cmost%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B.t2%3B%2C%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Buse%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bgeneration%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bquantity%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bsupply%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bamount%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bproduction%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bcost%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bflow%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bconsumption%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bconductor%20of%20electricity%3B%2Cc0