The three pie charts below show the changes in annual spending by a particular UK school in 1981, 1991 and 2001. Summarise the information by selecting and reporting the main features, and make comparisons where relevant.

The three pie charts compare the percentage of money a UK school spent on five different categories each year, namely: teacher's salaries, furniture and equipment, resources, insurance and other workers' salaries in the years 1981, 1991 and 2001.

Overall, the highest proportion of spending went to tutors' salaries whereas insurance was paid the least. There were slight changes in spending on furniture and equipment, resources and other workers' salaries.

In 1981, teachers' salaries were accounted for 40%. It increased by 10% after one decade before falling to 45% in 2001. In contrast, there were sharp drops in the expenditure of other employees' salaries, from 28% to 22% to 15% in 1981, 1991 and 2001 respectively.

On the other hand, the fund for furniture and equipment comprised 15% in 1981 but then declined by 10% ten years later. However, it rose significantly to 23% in 2001. The total percentage devoted to resources showed an initial increase from 15% to 20% in 1991 then dropped by 11%, as opposed to insurance, which increased steadily, from just 2% in 1981 to 8% in 2001.

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The three pie charts compare the percentage of total expenditures money a UK school spent on five different categories each year, namely: teacher's salaries, furniture and equipment, resources, insurance and other workers' salaries in the years 1981, 1991 and 2001.

Overall, the highest proportion of spending went to tutors' salaries whereas insurance was paid the least. There were slight changes in spending on furniture and equipment, resources and other workers' salaries.

In 1981, teachers' salaries were accounted for 40%. It increased by 10% after one decade before falling to 45% in 2001. In contrast, there were sharp drops in the expenditure percentages of other employees' salaries, from 28% to 22% to 15% in 1981, 1991 and 2001 respectively.

On the other hand, the fund for furniture and equipment comprised 15% in 1981 but then declined by 10% ten years later. However, it rose significantly to 23% in 2001. The total percentage devoted to resources showed an initial increase from 15% to 20% in 1991 then dropped by 11%, as opposed to insurance, which increased steadily, from just 2% in 1981 to 8% in 2001.


You will get a ok, but mediocre score for the essay. There were no bad mistakes in grammar, but all you did was copy numbers from the graphic to your text. To get higher band scores (7 or above) in Task 1, you must combine categories in a logical way rather than treating each one separately.

Sample essay. This essay is too long, but it will give you something to study.

You must combine categories together to get a high band score.

Vocabulary:

nondiscretionary spending - these are the items that you nave to spend money on, such as accommodation, utilities and food. For a school, it must pay salaries and insurance.

discretionary spending - these are the items in the budget that are extras or optional, such as computer games and eating out. For a school, this is furniture and resources because the old furniture and books can be used over many years before new ones are purchased.


The three pie charts, dated 1981, 1991 and 2001, compare the percentage of yearly spending in one UK school on five budget categories. These are teacher’s salaries, other workers' salaries, furniture and equipment, resources (e.g. books), and insurance.

Overall, the greatest proportion of the school's budget went to paying employees. The two categories representing discretionary items, furniture and equipment and resources, together took the next largest proportion of the total expenditures. The last category, insurance, was the smallest, but it had the greatest relative increase.

In 1981, salaries made up just over two-thirds of the school's budget (68%), with teachers taking 40% and other staff 28%. This went up slightly to 72% by 1991, with the 10% rise in the teacher's salaries offset by a 6% decline in that of the other workers. In that year, teachers' salaries took up half of the budget, the largest proportion of all three years. In 2001, the total percentage devoted to salaries had dropped to 60%, 45% for teachers and 15% for non-teaching staff. The two discretionary items had a large variation individually, ranging between 5% to 23% for furniture and 9% to 20% for resources. The sum, however, was relatively consistent, 30% in 1981, 25% in 1991 and 32% in 2001. Finally, the cost of insurance took only 2% of spending in 1981, but it quadrupled to 8% in 2001.

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I'm working on my task 1 writing skill and you've been a great help. I'll try again, thanks for helping out!