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Hi guys,

I apologize for this spamming, but I'm curious as squirrel...Emotion: smile. I hope you don't mind. All right, back to the point. Please what does it mean if I say that someone in a particular situation "did step in it" ? I didn't find the exact definition of this phrase, so that's why I'm asking.

Examples:

- Definitely, Obama did step in it when he started acting like a guilty party; however, the media is complicit in feeling the need to run to his defense.

- Bush really did step in it, big time. Talking about projection, I'm just waiting for the wingnuts to start using the word 'Manchurian candidate' to describe Obama.

- You did step in it, and it blew back on you.

My bet is that did step in it = screw something.It's new phrase for me, so I would like to have an confirmation from you.

Please it that correct? Does it have other meanings?

Many thanks for clarification.

regards

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JCDentonMy bet is that did step in it = screw something.It's new phrase for me, so I would like to have an confirmation from you.
You're pretty much right. It means to make an embarrassing and public mistake. I checked several on-line references and didn't find any that define this expression.
Note that it doesn't have to be "did step in it". In fact, your examples can be modified:

Definitely, Obama stepped in it when he started acting like a guilty party; however, the media is complicit in feeling the need to run to his defense.
You stepped in it, and it blew back on you.
Bush really did step in it, big time. Past tense here is probably right if the rest of the context matches.

You could even say "you stepped in big time" for a really major blunder.
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Think of the things you can step in - say, in a cow pasture or in a place where people walk their dogs. That "stuff" you step in is the stuff we're talking about stepping in - on a metaphorical level, of course.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Comments  
"It" is that brown-to-yellowish stuff that you step in on a farm or after someone has not curbed and cleaned up after the dog he or she was walking. "It" is difficult to remove from the shoes, and the process is not pleasant, usually rather smelly.
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thank you very much!