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"[He] wept through the proceedings. His tear soaked through the canvas that cloaked his twisted face and they stained his orange jumpsuit where with such rare distinction he once displayed the evidence of his outstanding contributions to the maintenance of a kingdom come."

-> What does "he wept through the proceedings" mean?

"we only did what we were told, [He says], but the laughter from the gallery drowns out these vestiges of a profession's oldest defense. The court will direct the record to reflect compliments from the bench; you sir, are central casting's crowning achievement. "

-> I don't understand what is the audience reaction here...? Can someone explain this to me?

Regards

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1. He cried through the trial.

2. He excuses his crime by saying he was just 'following orders'. The people watching laugh at this rubbish excuse and the judge says he is just acting. (the central casting comment).
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Thanks a lot Nona.

So "to weep through" is the same as "to cry" ?

And would you please precise what the following sentence means :

"The court will direct the record to reflect compliments from the bench"

Thanks again !
...and another one :

"The burned out shells of south-bound traffic lay strewn along a cold stretch of would-be interstate. "

Can anyone explain this to me ?

Thx a lot
Gniagnia wrote : So "to weep through" is the same as "to cry" ?

Yes. "To weep through the proceedings" means "to cry during the entire proceedings".

"The burned out shells of south-bound traffic lay strewn along a cold stretch of would-be interstate." (from "A Speculative Fiction" by Propagandi)

burned out shells of south-bound traffic : south-heading cars being burned out, only the metal chassis remain.

lay strewn: to be scattered

a cold stretch of would-be interstate: a section of road that used to be (or seems to be) an interstate highway.
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Whoever you are, Thanks a LOT.