+0
Hi teachers,
That’s too dangerous. They already think I’m a spy. Whatever I have to do I can do just as well with my fists.
Could, 'no matter what' and 'paying no attention to the consequences what' be suitable explanations to 'whatever' in the previous sentence?
I guess the second one is not suitable, could you rephrase it or give me another one please?

Thanks in advance.
Comments  
Thinking SpainCould, 'no matter what' and 'paying no attention to the consequences what' be suitable explanations to 'whatever' in the previous sentence?I guess the second one is not suitable, could you rephrase it or give me another one please?
Yes, it is unsuitable.

Whatever I have to do, I can do it just as well with my fists.
No matter what I have to do, I can do it just as well with my fists.
Regardless of what I have to do, I can do it just as well with my fists.
Mister MicawberWhatever I have to do, I can do it just as well with my fists.
No matter what I have to do, I can do it just as well with my fists.
Regardless of what I have to do, I can do it just as well with my fists.
Hi Mister Micawber,
Thank you for your reply. The sentence is from a book and even though it sounds logical with 'it', it is not written in it.

TS
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Yes, I was led astray. You do not need 'it' with 'whatever', but you do need 'it' with the other two alternatives.
Mister MicawberYes, I was led astray
Hi Mister Micawber,

By the way, could you tell me why 'it' is not needed with 'whatever'?
Nice to have you back in the right way.Emotion: wink
Thinking SpainBy the way, could you tell me why 'it' is not needed with 'whatever'?
I have no idea, sorry. Maybe another member will.
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Let's parse it out, starting with a re-write in honor of being a spy.

I can do whatever I have to do just as well with my fists as with a poisoned umbrella.
I can do (whatever I have to do) just as well with my fists as with a poisoned umbrella.

The clause in the parenthesis above is the direct object, and can be replaced by it.

I can do it just as well with my fists as with a poisoned umbrella.

The clause can be repositioned to the front of the sentence. It still is the direct object, unless the comma is added and the fused relative pronoun replaced, in which case it reads as an optional introductory dependent clause, not an object. Since the verb needs a direct object, the pronoun it suffices.

Whatever I have to do I can do just as well with my fists as with a poisoned umbrella. Direct object.

No matter what I have to do, I can do it just as well with my fists as with a poisoned umbrella. Introductory clause.
AlpheccaStarsLet's parse it out, starting with a re-write in honor of being a spy.
Hi A-Emotion: stars,
Thank you very much for your reply. That's quite an explanation for the reason.

Long life to spies.Emotion: beerEmotion: beer