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Could you correct the text below? The gray highlight is my comment.

Today, I will introduce Korean New Year. Unlike Japanese, Koreans celebrate lunar new years. On the New Year’s Day, relatives get together for lunch or dinner. Foods served are different by family, but there is a dish that is never missed. (always served) It’s Tteokguk, a soup served with sliced rice cakes like Japanese Ozoni. They say we get one year older when we eat Tteokguk.

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anonymousToday, I will introduce Korean New Year. Unlike Japanese, Koreans celebrate lunar new years. On the New Year’s Day, relatives get together for lunch or dinner. Food items that people have differ from family to family, but there is one common dish, Tteokguk, which is never missed. It’s a soup served with sliced rice cakes like the Japanese Ozoni. They say we get one year older when we eat Tteokguk.

Today, I will introduce the Korean New Year. Unlike in Japan, where the new year is reckoned by the Gregorian calendar, Koreans celebrate a lunar new year, as in China. On New Year’s Day, relatives get together for lunch or dinner. The dishes served differ by family, but there is a dish that is never left out—tteokguk, or sliced rice cake soup, similar to Japanese zoni. It is said you get one year older when you eat tteokguk.

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Thank you, vsuresh.

Thank you, anonymous.

anonymousUnlike in Japan, where the new year is reckoned by the Gregorian calendar,

according to

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It looks like your text was reviewed and maybe your question was answered, but there are some other things you might want to know, since we're here


1. Re: your grey highlighted section question, I think it's probably okay to use it in speech because we hear it a lot, but...

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/miss

Look at the definition of "miss" at the Cambridge dictionary link above. We "miss" seeing, noticing, or hearing someone or something (noun or gerund phrase). We miss a bus, miss our family, miss a deadline, etc. The result is almost always negative.

A "dish that is never missed " is technically incorrect usage for the verb. It is awkward, because the meaning can be confusing. It might not be all that important now, but I am just mentioning it for reference. Maybe you "never miss" it because it's disgusting.

For example, if you have some crazy relative that always gets drunk at birthday parties and causes problems, you would say that you "never miss him/her" or "won't miss him/her." So "always served" is the better choice, technically speaking.

BUT - Don't miss Gladiator 3! It's a great movie. (imperative, recommendation). Probably the source of the language confusion.

2. Differ v. different

different by for every family

differ (verb) by family

BUT - " We are different, by design." But you need a comma.


3. article use, see below.

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Today, I will introduce Korean New Year. Unlike the Japanese, Koreans celebrate lunar new years. On the New Year’s Day, relatives get together for lunch or dinner. Foods served are different by family, but there is a dish that is never missed. (always served) It’s Tteokguk, a soup served with sliced rice cakes like Japanese Ozoni. They say we get one year older when we eat Tteokguk.


Very interesting!

anonymousKoreans celebrate lunar new years.

The s in the last word is superfluous.