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Hello, friends.

Please, which is the correct way and why? Emotion: smile

Doubt #1

"color of the car" x "car color" x "car's color"
"leg of the cat" x "cat leg" x "cat's leg"
"pizza of yesterday" x "yesterday pizza" x "yesterday's pizza"

I've heard that Genitive Case is used only with nouns which are "living creatures" (humans, animals, etc.)? Is that true? So, "car's color" would be incorrect because "car" is not a living creature. So, when do I have to use OF, Genitive case or "nothing"?

Doubt #2

Sometimes, I see periods which contain direct speech within quotes. For example:

The father arrived home and said "Honey, I'm here!", then he dropped his briefcase on the couch.

1) Is the writing this period correct? Shouldn't I use colon before the direct speech?

The father arrived home and said: "Honey, I'm here!", then he dropped his briefcase on the couch.

2) When the direct speech is at the end of the sentence, where should I put the period? Example:

The father arrived home, dropped his briefcase on the couch and said "Honey, I'm here!" (???)

Do I have to put a period after the final quote? ... "Honey, I'm here!".

Is the exclamation mark considered the final punctuation of the sentence? ... "Honey, I'm here!"

What if the direct speech final punctuation is a regular period? ... "Honey, I'm here." (???)

Do I have to put another period after the final quote? ... "Honey, I'm here.".

Is the first period considered the last punctuation of the sentence? ... "Honey, I'm here."

Thank you very much for your attention, guys. Emotion: smile

Hugs,

brunces
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BruncesHello, friends.

Please, which is the correct way and why? Emotion: smile

Doubt #1

"color of the car" x "car color" x "car's color"
"leg of the cat" x "cat leg" x "cat's leg"
"pizza of yesterday" x "yesterday pizza" x "yesterday's pizza"

I've heard that Genitive Case is used only with nouns which are "living creatures" (humans, animals, etc.)? Is that true? So, "car's color" would be incorrect because "car" is not a living creature. So, when do I have to use OF, Genitive case or "nothing"?

I don't know where this "rule" came from.

It would be better to show the whole sentence in which you envision using "the car's color" or "the color" of the car because one might seem far more natural than the other.

Use the cat's leg in most situations. The cat's leg was caught under the sofa, but she's okay now.

The pizza of yesterday is highly unnatural sounding and yesterday pizza is just not correct. Yesterday's pizza is still in the frig if you want some.
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BruncesDoubt #2

Sometimes, I see periods which contain direct speech within quotes. For example:

The father arrived home and said, "Honey, I'm here!" and then dropped his briefcase on the couch.

1) Is the writing this period correct? Shouldn't I use colon before the direct speech? I never do this. He said, [comma]

The father arrived home and said: "Honey, I'm here!", then he dropped his briefcase on the couch.

2) When the direct speech is at the end of the sentence, where should I put the period? You don't need one. The end of the quotation serves as the end punctuation for the entire sentence.

Example: The father arrived home, dropped his briefcase on the couch and said "Honey, I'm here!" (???)

Do I have to put a period after the final quote? ... "Honey, I'm here!". Absolutely no.

Is the exclamation mark considered the final punctuation of the sentence? ... "Honey, I'm here!" Yes.

What if the direct speech final punctuation is a regular period? ... "Honey, I'm here." (???) There is agreement that the period goes inside the quotes in this case.

Do I have to put another period after the final quote? ... "Honey, I'm here.". No.

Is the first period considered the last punctuation of the sentence? ... "Honey, I'm here." Yes.

This is a style issue and will vary depending on which style guide you follow. The additional quirk is that in the US, the period and comma always, always go inside the quotes, even if it would not naturally fall there. The man came home and started to greet hsi wife, calling out "Honey, I'm...," but that was as far as he got before he noticed the dead wildebeast in his favorite recliner.

Sorry, but I'm still confused about the possession issue.

For example, "car crash". Is this a possessive case?

That movie, starring Nicolas Cage, "Lord of war". Why not "War lord" or "War's lord"? What's the difference? When do I have to use OF (Lord of war), 'S (War's lord) or "nothing" (War lord)?

Thanks for the punctuation comments. Emotion: smile

brunces
That's why we need to see the entire sentence. The possessive 's with inanimate objects is used to show how it applies specifically to that one thing. You refer to a table leg in general, but point to a table in the furniture store and say "That table's leg is scratched - if we buy it, can we get a discount?." You refer to a car engine in general, but "My car's engine is running rough."

Car crash - the noun is used as an adjective.

War lord has a specific meaning - I'm not sure what "Lord of War" was about so I can't comment on that one.
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