+0
Hi. Please correct these.

1.I have received several of the business proposals today.

2.Bobsledding is not done on the ground, nor is swimming.

3.On Saturday evenings, they visit friends, invite relatives to come over for dinner, or go to a movie, the theater, or a music event.

4. We welcomed any organization which/that was willing to come.

5. We welcomed any organization willling to come.
+0
Hi,
Please correct these.

These are all correct gramar, although you need a context in which it makes sense to say these things.

1.I have received several of the business proposals today.

2. Bobsledding is not done on the ground, nor is swimming.'On the ground' is an odd phrase, here. What does it mean in this context?

3.On Saturday evenings, they visit friends, invite relatives to come over for dinner, or go to a movie, the theater, or a music(al) event.

4. We welcomed any organization which/that was willing to come.

5. We welcomed any organization willling to come.

Best wishes, Clive
Comments  
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
You wrote/asked:

2. Bobsledding is not done on the ground, nor is swimming.'On the ground' is an odd phrase, here. What does it mean in this context?

I just made up that sentence. I had no exhaustive context in mind when I was writing that sentence -- it was just one sentence I was considering.

You corrected the following sentence of mine like this:

3.On Saturday evenings, they visit friends, invite relatives to come over for dinner, or go to a movie, the theater, or a music(al) event.

Do you think it is correct to follow up the words/phrase "go to" with "a movie", "a theater" and "a musical event" eventhough the last item is connected with "or"? Doesn't it make the sentence hard to follow?

Also, do you think this is correct? I think it is.

I think we should institute an infrastructure in which we can travel effectively.

Here, do you think we could make sure whether the preposition "in" is correct by making (sort of?) a sentence like this?

We can travel effectively in an infrastructure.

Does it have to be "an" before "infracture"? Could it make it this to test whether or not the preposition is correct or not?

We can travel effectively in the infrastructure.

Or do you think it doesn't make any difference. Note there is no "the" in the original sentence.

Hi,



You corrected the following sentence of mine like this:

3.On Saturday evenings, they visit friends, invite relatives to come over for dinner, or go to a movie, the theater, or a music(al) event.

Do you think it is correct to follow up the words/phrase "go to" with "a movie", "a theater" and "a musical event" eventhough the last item is connected with "or"? Doesn't it make the sentence hard to follow?
It's fine. Do you find it hard to understand the meaning?

Also, do you think this is correct? I think it is.

I think we should institute an infrastructure in which we can travel effectively.
I think you are making up somewhat random sentences again. The idea of 'travelling in an infrastructure' sounds pretty strange and unnatural.

Here, do you think we could make sure whether the preposition "in" is correct by making (sort of?) a sentence like this? Yes, sometimes it's easier to look at the statement form instead of the question form, to review the underlying grammar.

We can travel effectively in an infrastructure.

Does it have to be "an" before "infracture"? Could it make it this to test whether or not the preposition is correct or not?

We can travel effectively in the infrastructure.

Or do you think it doesn't make any difference. Note there is no "the" in the original sentence.

'an' or 'the' makes no difference to the preposition.

Clive