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The bar chart shows the highest qualification attained by sex for the working-age population in Wales in 2001/02

Summarize the information by selecting and reporting the main features, and make comparisons where relevant

The bar chart compares the percentages of males and females belonging to the working-age group who obtained the highest qualification in Wales. The data is shown in the two years 2001 and 2002.

Overall, the proportion of men who succeeded in having GCE A level or equivalent significantly doubled that of women. Whilst, there were much more females in percentage receiving GCSE grade A* than men did. Additionally, ratios of men other indicators have slightly occupied more as opposed to that of women and vice versa.

Initially, there was a hefty 28 percent of men achieving GCE A level or equivalent in comparison with only a mere 15 percent of women. Conversely, in GCSE, the proportion of females having A* -C or equivalent predominated that of men, 28 percent and 18 percent respectively. The ratio of men in other qualifications made up by over 12 percent merely higher than that of women, at over 10 percent. With no qualifications, there was an overwhelming proportion of females, by nearly 25 percent while the value of males was 5 percent fewer, at exactly 20 percent. Furthermore, there was a mere disproportion of both sexes progressing towards higher education, the data of the two were both under 10 percent, more or less 9 percent for women and 7 percent for men.

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It really helps to know the British Education system to understand this chart.
It is completely foreign to Americans!

The General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) was first introduced in 1986. GCSE courses are taught in the last two years of secondary school, of the National Curriculum in England.

A-Levels, short for Advanced Levels, are a higher qualification than the GCSEs. A-Levels are subject-based qualifications.

GCSE grades 9 to 4 (A* to C) – Certificate and qualification awarded. Considered a 'good pass',

In the US, these are equivalent groups

University degree

Junior college (associates, 2-year) degree

High school degree, average grades A-B, with some college-level preparatory classes

High school degree, passing grade.

Other qualification (e.g. Trade school/vocational school)

No qualifications - did not complete high school

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The bar chart compares the percentages of working-age males and females belonging to the working-age group who obtained the highest qualification (That is not correct. The bar chart also plots those with no qualifications at all!) in Wales. The data is shown in the two years for 2001 and 2002.

Overall, the proportion of men who succeeded in having GCE A level or equivalent significantly doubled (incorrect. Double is a dynamic verb. Use is for values that increase in time. Do not use it for static, one-time comparisons between two groups. Use the adjective "double".) that of women. Whilst, there were much more (Much more is for non-count items. There is much more milk that we can use. Would you like to have some?) females in percentage receiving GCSE grade A* than men did. Additionally, ratios of men other indicators have slightly occupied more (That makes no sense at all. A ratio is composed of two numbers with a colon between them, for example 3:2, or 105:100. What do you mean? ) as opposed to that of women and vice versa.

Initially, there were was a hefty (That word does not fit.) 28 percent of men achieving GCE A level or equivalent in comparison with only a mere 15 percent of women. Conversely, in GCSE, the proportion of females having A* -C or equivalent predominated was higher than that of men, 28 percent and 18 percent respectively. The ratio (Please tell us what you are referring to. ) of men in other qualifications made up by over (awkward, unnatural) 12 percent merely (wrong word) higher than that of women, at over 10 percent. (30% is over 10% and so is 21%. Be specific.) With no qualifications, there was an overwhelming proportion of females, by nearly 25 percent (awkward, unnatural) while the value of males was 5 percent fewer, at exactly 20 percent. Furthermore, there was a mere disproportion (wrong phrase) of both sexes progressing towards higher education, (What groups are you referring to?) the data of the two were both under 10 percent, more or less 9 percent for women and 7 percent for men.

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Comments  

I am sorry for attaching the blurred image. I enclose here another better one. Thank you!!

Nhựt QuangI am sorry for attaching the blurred image. I enclose here another better one.

I cannot read that one, either.

This one may be much better. I hope you would have a look and check my writing. Thanks so much!!

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Nhựt Quang

This one may be much better. I hope you would have a look and check my writing. Thanks so much!!

It is exactly the same blurry small bar chart.

I enclosed again another bigger and clearer image. I hope you could have a look and check my writing. Thanks so much for that!!!!

I enclosed again another bigger and clearer image. I hope you could have a look and check my writing. Thanks so much for that!!!!

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.

I enclosed here another clearer and bigger image. I hope you would have a look at my writing. Thanks so much for that!!

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