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hi for everyone, I'm studing english for exam which i have in April. I have several questions ( or maybe more than several Emotion: smile ) to ask and i hope you can help me understand the meanings of the words and idioms. ( I will emphasize them inblue color ).

Some peole enjoy finding fault.

I thought that it's mean "Some people are quite critical to themselves", but it isn't ...

Catapuls, which held off the first Roman siege of Syracuze.

How can I say "put an end " in different way? if it other idiom or expression for it?

After such an intensive training he is sure to be ......... in the race. (succeeed or successful ? And why? What is the difference? Please, give me examples of using it right , both of it.

They had to go short of food.

Writing nationality in documents must be ........ (cancelled or abolished ).

This book .......... by the end of the month. ( will publish , ought to be published , is going to translate ) What is the right?

The ............... of books nowadays is rather low. ( price or worth )

We are going to finish this work ......... two days. ( in, by, on, over )

The same entreary to give examples to each one.

Thanks.
Comments  
Some peole enjoy finding fault.
I would take this to mean that some people enjoying pointing out the mistakes of others.

Catapuls, which held off the first Roman siege of Syracuze.
Did you misspell catapults? Held off ususally means something like "to fight to a stand still." or "to delay". In this sentence, it means that catapults helped fight off the Romans.

How can I say "put an end " in different way? if it other idiom or expression for it?
I am not sure. Would cease work? I suppose terminate, stop, or destroy might also work. It depends on the context.

After such an intensive training he is sure to be ......... in the race. (succeeed or successful ? And why? What is the difference? Please, give me examples of using it right , both of it.
It should be successful. I don't think I can explain why.
He is a successful architect. That was a a successful business venture.
We succeeded in getting tickets to the show.

They had to go short of food.
Short of food means there was a food shortage and they didn't have food to eat.

Writing nationality in documents must be ........ (cancelled or abolished ).
This makes no sense to me. I don't think you can "write nationality". Did you copy this exactly?

This book .......... by the end of the month. ( will publish , ought to be published , is going to translate ) What is the right?
I am pretty sure the answer is ought to be published.
The magazine will publish an article on Halloween.
I am going to translate this book into English.

The ............... of books nowadays is rather low. ( price or worth )
They both sound okay to me. The real answer will depend on context.

We are going to finish this work ......... two days. ( in, by, on, over )
I think the answer is in, but some people might tell you it is by.
>I will emphasize them in blue color
I don't see that.
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It is a very dark blue.
Thank you Formlit , you really helped me with all those expressions.

But maybe you can explain the differenses between in, on, by, over (in the last sentence) Can you write the exsemples to each one.

And how do you know that the right answer it "ought to be published" ? Word "ought" mean "want to be"?

I know you simply feel it but may be you could explain it to me.

Thanks.
This book .......... by the end of the month. ( will publish , ought to be published , is going to translate )

Only ought to be published works.

A book cannot publish ortranslateEmotion: smile, but is (being) published or translated.

You need a passive
(
will be published, ought to be published , is going to be translated)
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Marius Hanco explained a lot. That is just as well, because I am not sure I could've given a coherent explantion.

I'll try to explain in, by, on and over.
We are going to finish this work ......... two days. ( in, by, on, over )

We are going to finish this work over two days.
If you use over, it means that the work will be done over the course of two days. It means you will start the work the first day and be done by the second day.

On doesn't really work for me. That is to say, I've never heard it used with two days. You can say something like this: we are going to finish this work on monday, we are going to finish this work on the 27th or we are going to finish this work on a more postive note. I am not sure why two days doesn't work for me. Someone else might be able to explain that.

As for the difference between in and by, I believe there was a discussion on that. I don't remember where it was. If I find it, I'll post a link.
thank you Formlit and Marius Hancu.

I don't pay attention that it should be passive... All these times...it's too complicate...

ok, i woun't complain Emotion: smile

But you help me with my mistakes, thanks you once again.

Where are you from?