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7.It is very easy to acquire bad habits, such as eating too many sweets or too much food,
or drinking too much fluid of any kind, or smoking. The more we do a thing, the more we
tend to like doing it; and, if we do not continue to do it, we feel unhappy. This is called
the force of habit, and the force of habit should be fought against.
Things which may be very good when only done from time to time, tend to become very
harmful when done too often and too much. This applies even to such good things as
work or rest. Some people form a bad habit of working too much, and others of idling too
much. The wise men always remembers that this is true about himself, and checks any bad habit. He

says to himself, "I am now becoming idle," or "I like too many sweets," or "I smoke too much" and

then adds, "I will get myself out of this bad habit at once."
One of the most widely spread of bad habits is the use of tobacco.

Tobacco is now smoked or chewed by men, often by women, and even by children, almost all over the
world. It was brought into Europe from America by Sir Walter Raleigh, four centuries
ago, and has thence spread everywhere. I very much doubt whether there is any good in
the habit, even when tobacco is not used to excess; and it is extremely difficult to get rid
of the habit when once it has been formed.

Alcohol is taken in almost all cool and cold climates, and to a very much less extent in
hot ones. Thus, it is taken by people who live in the Himalaya Mountains, but not nearly
so much by those who live in the plains of India. Alcohol is not necessary in any way to
anybody. Millions of people are beginning to do without it entirely; and once the United
States of America have passed laws which forbid its manufacture or sale throughout the
length and breadth of their vast country. In India it is not required by the people at all,
and should be avoided by them altogether. The regular use of alcohol, even in small
quantities, tends to cause mischief in many ways to various organs of the body. It affects
the liver, it weakens the mental powers, and lessens the general energy of the body.

Summary

Bad habits, such as excessive eating,drinking or smoking, are easy to acquire.We should stop doing excess of anything.Things including work or rest are good when done in moderation, but when done in unrestrained manner causes harm to our body.Wise man always have a check on his bad habits.Tobacco chewing is a common bad habit among men,women and even children.Once acquainted,it is very difficult to renounce it.Likewise, alcohol is consumed more in colder region than in hotter region.Alcohol does not help anyone.USA once had abandoned it completely.In India its consumption should be avoided.Regular use of alcohol, irrespective of quantity take, degrades mental and physical powers of the body.
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How does a man become used to bad habits

It is very easy to acquire bad habits, such as eating too many sweets or too much food or drinking too much fluid of any kind, or smoking. The more we do a thing, the more we tend to like doing it, and if we do not continue to do it, we feel unhappy. This is called the force of habit, and the force of habit should be fought against. Things which may be very good when only done from time to time, tend to become very harmful when done too often and too much. This applies even to such good things as work or rest. Some people form a bad habit of working too much, and others of idling too much. The wise man always remembers that this is true about him, and checks any bad habit. He says to himself, “I am now becoming idle”, or “I like too many sweets, or “I smoke too much” and then adds, “I will get myself out of this bad habit at once.”

One of the most widely spread of bad habits is the use of tobacco. Tobacco is now smoked or chewed by men, often by men and even by children, almost all over the world. It was brought into Europe from America by Sir Walter Raleigh, four centuries ago, and has thence spread everywhere.

Alcohol is taken in almost all cool and cold climates, and to a very much less extent in hot ones. Thus, it is taken by people who live in the Himalaya Mountains, but not nearly so much by those who live in the plains of India. Alcohol is not necessary in any way to anybody. Millions of people are beginning to do without it entirely: and once the United States of America have passed a law which forbids its manufacture or sale throughout the length and breadth of their vast country. In Pakistan, it is not required by the people at all, and should be avoided by them altogether. The regular use of alcohol, even in small quantities, tends to cause mischief in many ways to various organs of the body. It affects the liver, it weakens the mental powers, and lessens the general energy of the body.