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Hi teachers,
According to this paragraph:
Alex slept for many hours, and the next morning Marta put a big breakfast on the table. Alex ate hungrily, and Marta talked.
What’s happening to this country?’ she said. ‘I don’t know.

1. How many hours did Alex rest? Many hours.
2. What did Marta make the day after? A big breakfast.
3. Did both of them eat ravenously? No, they didn’t. Only Alex did.
4. Was Marta aware of what was going on in her nation? No, she wasn’t.

Thanks in advance.
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1. How LONG did Alex rest?
2. Okay, or What did Marta give him?
3. "Ravenously" seems awkward and based on things you've told us about your class, too advanced. Just ask if they both ate.
4. I would have guessed Marta was speaking rhetorically, that she knew what was going on, but not why or what to do about it. For example, I might say "What is going on with Congress?" about my nation's government, even though I know all too well. You might need more context for a good question here. Or you could say "What did Marta talk about."
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Grammar Geek4. I would have guessed Marta was speaking rhetorically, that she knew what was going on, but not why or what to do about it. For example, I might say "What is going on with Congress?" about my nation's government, even though I know all too well. You might need more context for a good question here. Or you could say "What did Marta talk about."
Hi Grammar Geek,
Your guess is absolutely right.
Then the resulting one should be:
What did Marta talk about? She talked about her country.
On second thought, isn't that one too general? Maybe not, maybe it is very appropriate for the context.

TS
talked... she talked about
Grammar Geektalked... she talked about
Hi GG,
Sorry about that one. The rush, my rush made that mistake. Emotion: embarrassed

TS
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