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Could anyone please explain to me - when to use "𝒕𝒐 𝒃𝒆 +𝑽𝒆𝒓𝒃+𝒊𝒏𝒈" 𝒂𝒏𝒅 "𝒕𝒐 𝒃𝒆" in a sentence?Example = 1. 𝑰𝒕'𝒔 𝒘𝒂𝒚 𝒕𝒐o 𝒍𝒂𝒕𝒆 𝒇𝒐𝒓 𝒔𝒐𝒎𝒆𝒐𝒏𝒆 𝒕𝒐 𝒃𝒆 𝒎𝒂𝒌𝒊𝒏𝒈 𝒏𝒐𝒊𝒔𝒆 𝒂𝒕 𝒕𝒉𝒂𝒕 𝒕𝒊𝒎𝒆 𝒐𝒇 𝒏𝒊𝒈𝒉𝒕.2. 𝒀𝒐𝒖 𝒑𝒓𝒐𝒃𝒂𝒃𝒍𝒚 𝒅𝒊𝒅𝒏'𝒕 𝒎𝒆𝒂𝒏 𝒕𝒉𝒂𝒕 𝒕𝒐 𝒃𝒆 𝒇𝒖𝒏𝒏𝒚.If I write the first sentence like this "𝑰𝒕'𝒔 𝒘𝒂𝒚 𝒕𝒐o 𝒍𝒂𝒕𝒆 𝒇𝒐𝒓 𝒔𝒐𝒎𝒆𝒐𝒏𝒆 𝒎𝒂𝒌𝒊𝒏𝒈 𝒏𝒐𝒊𝒔𝒆 𝒂𝒕 𝒕𝒉𝒂𝒕 𝒕𝒊𝒎𝒆 𝒐𝒇 𝒏𝒊𝒈𝒉𝒕" and the 2nd sentence like this "𝒀𝒐𝒖 𝒑𝒓𝒐𝒃𝒂𝒃𝒍𝒚 𝒅𝒊𝒅𝒏'𝒕 𝒎𝒆𝒂𝒏 𝒕𝒉𝒂𝒕 𝒇𝒖𝒏𝒏𝒚". What would be the problem in this sentences?
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English has different forms of the infinitive. An infinitive is a verb, but it does not have tense.

The base form is to + verb. It is quite commonly used.

I like to eat cake.
He is too young to vote.
He was too drunk to drive.

The progressive form is to be verb+ing. The action has a continuous nature and is happening at the same time as the verb in in the main clause

After a car crash: You were too drunk to be driving. You should have let me drive.

Hasibrahman1. 𝑰𝒕'𝒔 𝒘𝒂𝒚 𝒕𝒐o 𝒍𝒂𝒕𝒆 𝒇𝒐𝒓 𝒔𝒐𝒎𝒆𝒐𝒏𝒆 𝒕𝒐 𝒃𝒆 𝒎𝒂𝒌𝒊𝒏𝒈 𝒏𝒐𝒊𝒔𝒆 𝒂𝒕 𝒕𝒉𝒂𝒕 𝒕𝒊𝒎𝒆 𝒐𝒇 𝒏𝒊𝒈𝒉𝒕

It's too late to make noise. (This suggests one loud noise, like slamming a door.)
It's too late to be making noise. (This means a party with people singing and laughing and yelling for an hour or more.)

Your second sentence is not grammatical.

X It's way too late for someone making noise at that time of night.


You can use a gerund form.

Making noise at that time of night will bother all the neighbors. (subject)

John's mother punished him for making noise at that time of night. (object of preposition)

Hasibrahman"𝒀𝒐𝒖 𝒑𝒓𝒐𝒃𝒂𝒃𝒍𝒚 𝒅𝒊𝒅𝒏'𝒕 𝒎𝒆𝒂𝒏 𝒕𝒉𝒂𝒕 𝒇𝒖𝒏𝒏𝒚".

That is not grammatical English.



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HasibrahmanCould anyone please explain to me when to use "𝒕𝒐 𝒃𝒆 +𝑽𝒆𝒓𝒃+𝒊𝒏𝒈" 𝒂𝒏𝒅 "𝒕𝒐 𝒃𝒆" in a sentence?

It would be more useful for you if we explained a few grammar patterns that have infinitives. These are not limited to the verb be.

The basic pattern is FOR ______ TO ______.

After for you have a subject. After to you have a verb. This pattern is analogous to a subject and verb of a normal sentence.

Examples:

Normal sentence ................. Infinitive pattern

a) Dan succeeded. .......... for Dan to succeed
b) The manager made good on his promise.
..........................for the manager to make good on his promise
c) The bird escaped. ...... for the bird to escape


So the question is when to use these infinitive patterns in longer sentences.

These patterns always depend on what comes before them. There is no list that you can memorize. You learn these by practicing with a few and then you learn new ones as you read and listen to more and more English.

Some typical patterns that are used to introduce infinitive patterns are

It's easy / It's hard / It's time / It's too late / It's too early

but there are many others.

Here are the examples from above used in full sentences:

a) It would be difficult for Dan to succeed.
b) It's now time for the manager to make good on his promise.
c) The children left the window open for the bird to escape.


Here's how your first example works.

Normal sentence: Someone is making noise at that time of night.
Infinitive pattern: for someone to be making noise at that time of night
Note that 'to be' comes from 'is'.
Infinitive pattern used after a variant of "It's too late":

It's way too late for someone to be making noise at that time of night.


This is a lot to learn from just one post, so I will add just this short note about the second example.

Sometimes the FOR is omitted. You have to learn each example separately.

Normal: That is funny.
Infinitive: for that to be funny
In the example sentence, 'for' is omitted:
You probably didn't mean for that to be funny.

CJ

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Comments  
Thanks for your response! It would be better if you wrote the techniques of using "to be" and "to be + Verb+ing" I mean when I need to use these things in saying or writing a sentence.
HasibrahmanIt would be better if you wrote the techniques of using "to be" and "to be + Verb+ing" I mean when I need to use these things

I gave you examples.

"to be + verb-ing" is when we want to emphasize that the action lasts for a length of time.

I don't know what you mean by "techniques."

Here are more examples of the continuous infinitive:

Many thousands of refugees are thought to be living illegally in the country.
In ten years, I want to be living in a million-dollar penthouse.
I don't need to be surfing the internet on my mobile at every single moment of the day.
People aren't going to be voting next Tuesday. The officials have postponed the election.
The boys are really excited to be playing a soccer match in front of their family and friends.
He has escaped from jail. He is reported to be sleeping in a different location every night.
Most people would be thrilled to be making $75,000 or more a year.

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
AlpheccaStars An infinitive is a verb, but it does not have tense.

Scandinavian grammarians think an infinitive has two tenses:

Present infinitive: He must be rich.

Perfect infinitive: He must have been rich.

My native language has five infinitives, but Swedish, Norwegian and Danish are all Germanic languages and they have the same two infinitives as English. The terms 'present infinitive' and 'perfect infinitive' are commonly used in English grammar books written by European grammarians. I have several grammar books in which these terms occur, eg R W Zandvoort, A Handbook of English Grammar and A J Thomson and A V Martinet, A Practical English Grammar for Foreign Students.

CB

Cool BreezeScandinavian grammarians think an infinitive has two tenses:

I would call your examples the modal and perfect modal forms.

Modal verbs are not inflected as regular verbs are.

Terminology varies considerably among the various linguists and schools of thought.

In my original answer, I did not list all the possible infinitive forms. I considered it, but thought it would be more confusing than helpful. I limited my post to the forms the OP was inquiring about.

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