+0
CHOOSE THE CORRECT ANSWER AND FILL IN THE BLANKS FOR T HE FOLLOWING AND EXPLAIN WHY YOUCHOSE THAT ANSWER.

1.There aren't..............biscuits on this plate.

A. too much B. a lot C.enough D.some

2.I wanted to go out this evening but i haven't ............... money.

A. any B.many C.some D.no

3. Before the film begins all the tickets ..............collected.

A.had been B.will have been C.are being D.were being.

(for question 3 under what circumstances is C being the correct answer possible?)
+0
Hi,

Shasam, you didn't tell us what your answers were.

Averell, you are right about #1 and #2.

3. Before the film begins all the tickets ..............collected.

A.had been B.will have been C.are being D.were being.

(for question 3 under what circumstances is C being the correct answer possible?)

B and C are possible. C means the tickets are being collected now, at time of speaking, or in the very near future. B is telling us about two future events: 'will have been' tells us that the ticket-collection will be completed before the the beginning of the film.

Best wishes, Clive

+0
Hello

I'll put my two cents on the questions #1 and #2.

1. There aren't enough biscuits on this plate.
"Biscuits" is a countable noun and so it can't go with "too much". "A lot biscuits" is not good; it should be "a lot of biscuits". "Some biscuits" can't be used in a negative sentence.

2. I wanted to go out this evening but I haven't any money.
"Many" can't go with the uncountable noun "money". "Some money" is OK, but it can't be used in a negative sentence. You can't say "I haven't no money", because double negative constructs such as <not ... no ..> are prohibited in standard English.
paco
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Comments  
1. C - enough.

Some: My teacher taught me that some is not used in negative sentence.

Too much: biscuits is a plural noun, so cannot use much. Also, I've never seen too much in a negative situation.

A lot: I dont know, but I won't use.

2. A - any.

No: no = not any. We have had not here, so we only need any, not no.

Many: money is an uncountable noun, can't use with some.

3. I'm not sure when C will be the correct answer. We have the word before here, so, cannot use continuous tense, so, both C and D are incorrect. I think B is the most suitable, but if I write this sentence, it will be: Before the film begins all the tickets have been collected.
 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
 paco2004's reply was promoted to an answer.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.