The bar chart compares four different countries in terms of the proportion of youngsters enrolling in higher education in three years 2000, 2005 and 2010.

Overall, the most striking feature is that there were upward trends in the percentage of young people entering higher education in three out of four countries, while the figure for country B remained unchanged over the period given. Another interesting point is country D had the highest participant levels in all three years.

Looking at the details, in 2000, precisely 60% of young people taking part in higher education in country D, whereas the corresponding figure for country A was considerably lower, at just under 40%.One decade later, these figures soared to 80% and nearly 60%, respectively.

As regards the two remaining nations, it is clear that country C witnessed a slight increase in young people’s university participation, from 50% in 2000 to approximately 52% in 2010. The pattern for country B was the reverse, with the figure leveling off at 40% over the period shown despite a marginal drop of 2% in 2015

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It reveals the percentage of young people in higher education in 2000, 2005 and 2010.

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The bar chart compares four different countries in terms of the proportion of young individuals youngsters [ 1] enrolling in higher education in three years 2000, 2005 and 2010.

Overall, the most striking feature is that there were upward trends in the percentage of young people entering higher education in three two out of the four countries, while the figures for countries B and C remained largely unchanged over the period given. Another interesting point is that country D had the highest participation participant levels in all three years.

Looking at the details, in 2000, precisely 60% of young people taking part were in higher education in country D, whereas the corresponding figure for country A was considerably lower, at just under 40%. One decade later, these figures soared to 80% and nearly 60%, respectively.

As regards the two remaining nations, it is clear that country C witnessed a slight increase in the proportion of young people in ’s university, participation, from 50% in 2000 to approximately 52% in 2010. The pattern for country B was the reverse, with the figure leveling off at 40% over the period for two of those years, shown despite a marginal drop of 2% in 2015.

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[ 1]: University students are too old to be called youngsters.

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