+0
Hi guys,
can you please help me with one phrase?
Dialog context: Two women are gossiping in the restaurant. One these women is Arriana. She works as the victim advocate (special legal work in the US, she deals with the victims of the violent crimes. But it's not a classic lawyer work.). And Val, her partner, just realized that she didn't quit her job, which was obviously exhausting her...She went postal about it.

Val: You decided not to quit.

Arriana: Val, I really agonized over it.

Val: You said SUNY(famous university in NY) has a great psych program. You already got accepted.

Arriana: It take two years to get my master's. And then I'd have to go get my hours(?????).

Val: You can open your own practice. Think of all the people you can help.
I've been digging through the internet for some time and my guess is that her intentions are to study and work concurrently. Because at the end of this conversation she said: "I can't quit". So by the "go get my hours" she probably means that she would have to be in work the same time as she has been before, which would be hard if she'd be visiting that university. I found other examples...
- I remember times at past jobs where I was wandering around the office with nothing to do but I had to hang around to get my hours in.

- When I came by to get my hours one day, the entire two weeks was blank. The manager appeared clueless but the head wait interpreted it for me.

Is my idea correct? I've never heard this phrase before, so I'm asking.
Guys thank you in advance!
Best Regards
JCD
+0
Credits at many universities and colleges are expressed as so many semester/quarter hours. In this case, however, I think it has something to do with hours on the job. It isn't really clear to me.
+0
Hi,

can you please help me with one phrase?

Dialog context: Two women are gossiping in the restaurant. One these women is Arriana. She works as the victim advocate (special legal work in the US, she deals with the victims of the violent crimes. But it's not a classic lawyer work.). And Val, her partner, just realized that she didn't quit her job, which was obviously exhausting her...She went postal about it.

Val: You decided not to quit.

Arriana: Val, I really agonized over it.

Val: You said SUNY(famous university in NY) has a great psych program. You already got accepted.

Arriana: It take two years to get my master's. And then I'd have to go get my hours(?????).

Val: You can open your own practice. Think of all the people you can help.

I've been digging through the internet for some time and my guess is that her intentions are to study and work concurrently. Because at the end of this conversation she said: "I can't quit". So by the "go get my hours" she probably means that she would have to be in work the same time as she has been before, which would be hard if she'd be visiting that university.

It sounds like it means this.
If she got her degree, she'd have to work for a number of hours in that field to get certified or qualified.
A lawyer, for example, in some countries must be articled ie he must work with an experienced lawyer for a period of time before setting up his own practice.
Medical doctors often have to do residencies, ie work in a hospital for a period of time..

Best wishes, Clive
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Comments  
I also read it as the probationary or post-qualification experience that Arriana would need to clock up before being able to set up in her own practice, as mentioned by Val. I assume from the context that Arriana had planned to retrain as a psychotherapist or psychologist (hence the 'psych' course, and Val's comment that she could help a lot of people).

Perhaps someone might be more familiar with the qualification and regulation system of this career in the US?
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Hi

Here's a minor comment.

Two women are gossiping in the restaurant. I don't see anything in this given dialogue that could reasonably be termed 'gossiping'. 'Gossip' usually invoves unimportant talk about personalities or social activities.

Best wishes, Clive
Guys thank you for perfect explanation! It's clear to me now.
CliveHi
Here's a minor comment.

Two women are gossiping in the restaurant. I don't see anything in this given dialogue that could reasonably be termed 'gossiping'. 'Gossip' usually invoves unimportant talk about personalities or social activities.

Best wishes, Clive

Okay Clive, next time I'll be more carefull with these strong words. Emotion: smile
Thank you again for perfect help!