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1.She thought Roger Clinton was nothing but trouble. She was right about the trouble part, but not the “nothing but.” There was more to him than that, which makes his story even sadder.

2.but he couldn’t ever quite break free of the shadows of self-doubt, the phony security of binge drinking and adolescent partying, and the isolation from and verbal abuse of Mother that kept him from becoming the man he might have been.

3.I had never heard a shot fired before, much less seen one.

4.Although she had only one arm, she didn’t believe in sparing the rod, or, in her case, the paddle, into which she had bored holes to cut down on the wind resistance.

Jersey.
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1.She thought Roger Clinton was nothing but trouble. She was right about the trouble part, but not the “nothing but.” There was more to him than that, which makes his story even sadder.

At the beginning, she thought that R. C. would only bring/cause her problems. She was partly right: he could/would? bring problems, but that wasn't his only characteristic. He also had very interesting sides.
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Hi,

2.but he couldn’t ever quite break free of the shadows of self-doubt, the phony security of binge drinking and adolescent partying, and the isolation from and verbal abuse of Mother that kept him from becoming the man he might have been.

The grammar is OK, although a little clumsy due to the various prepositions. However, the meaning is not clear. If you separate the two ideas here, this phrase becomes

the isolation from Mother This sounds a bit strange, because it means he was isolated from her. How then could there be verbal abuse?

the verbal abuse of Mother This sounds fairly OK, although it's a bit unclear whether he was abusing his Mother, or she was abusing him.

Best wishes, Clive
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Comments  
3.I had never heard a shot fired before, much less seen one.

I had seen a shot fired still less often than I had heard one fired. (less often than never). So, never never never.
I think there's a problem with sentence n°2; it's either "from" or "and", but wait for a native...
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 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.