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Could you please take a look at my corrections and correct them please?

1 I hope she will speaks well of me to the dean. OK
2 I tend to only see the good of people. IN PEOPLE
3 I have better things to do than OK
4 Where else could she be than there. THAN or OTHER THAN ???
5 Who do you want to do your speech at the wedding/see do your speech at the wedding? NOT SURE

THank you
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1 I hope she will speaks well of me to the dean. OK

Either:
I hope she will speak well of me to the dean.

Or:
I hope she speaks well of me to the dean.

2 I tend to only see the good of people. IN PEOPLE
3 I have better things to do than OK
4 Where else could she be than there. THAN or OTHER THAN ???
5 Who do you want to do your speech at the wedding/see do your speech at the wedding? NOT SURE [Both are 'ok', however as you listen to a speech, the first option is more better, although some people will use the second option. The other option is "Who do you want to give you speech..." which I think is better. Speeches are given - "he will give a speech" / "The president gave a speech about the economy."]
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Can someone please tell me what they think of my corrections please?

Thank you
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 free_spirit's reply was promoted to an answer.
Thank you,

But for the last one,

What if I were to say

Who do you want to win? Him or her? (This doesn't make sense to me)

I'd say

Who do you want to see win? Him or her?

Am I right?
Both are correct. Personally, I would probably use the first one "Who do you want to win?"

"Who do you want to win? Mike Tyson or that new guy?"
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I'm reading the sentence and thinking it's missing something.

I'd say

Who do you want to beat up? I want to beat him up

Who do you want to win ? I want to win him that doesn't make sense.

I want them to win. this makes sense which is why "Who do you want to win?" doesn't make sense to me even though I've heard people say it.

Am I making sense?
I'm reading the sentence and thinking it's missing something.

I'd say

Who do you want to beat up? I want to beat him up

Who do you want to win ? I want him to win

I want them to win. this makes sense which is why "Who do you want to win?" doesn't make sense to me even though I've heard people say it.

Am I making sense?

The problem is there is no singular gender-neutral pronoun equivalent of "them". You can choose "him" or her" only (you can't have 'it' win when you are talking about people). "Them" is plural, and gender-neutral. In informal speech, you can have "them" refering to a singular male or female, however it is grammatically incorrect. Perhaps the usage of him has come from a corruption of English speaker who pronounce words with a silent h, making it "go get 'im", misinterpretted as "go get 'em" (which properly would be a contraction of "them") - I don't know.

In you case, as you are speaking about beating "him" up, you want "him" to win, unless the person doing the beating is a women, and you want "her" to win.