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Task 1: The chart below shows the percentage of households in owned and rented accommodation in England and Wales between 1918 and 2011. Summarize the information by selecting and reporting the main features and make comparisons where relevant.


The chart below illustrates the numerous households in owned and rented houses in England and Wales from 1918 to 2011.

It is clear that the percentage of household in the rented house was on a decreasing trend on the given period while a higher percentage of families settled in their own homes.

In 1918, more than three-quarters of households in England and Wales need accommodation with the figure being approximately 80 percent, compared with the small number of around 22 percent who have their place to live. From that year onward, that percentage decreased significantly to roughly 31 percent in 2001 but increased slightly to about 36 percent in 2011. Additionally, in 1971, both figures recorded 50 percent, half living in owned and half in rented accommodation.

In terms of the figures of families dwelling in the owned home, it was just around 22 percent in 1918 and increased to about 32 percent in 1939. After that, the ratio gradually increased from 1939 to 1991 before reaching a peak of nearly 70 percent in 2001 and decreased to approximately 64 percent in 2011.


Thank you for correcting for me >...<

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The chart below (What kind of chart?) illustrates (wrong word choice) the numerous (wrong word) households in owned and rented houses in England and Wales from 1918 to 2011.

It is clear that the percentage of household (wrong form) in the rented house (Does everyone live in one house?) was on a decreasing trend on the given period while a higher percentage of families had settled in their own homes.

In 1918, more than three-quarters of households in England and Wales need accommodation (Are they homeless?) with the figure percentage being approximately 80 percent, compared with the small number of around 22 percent who have their place to live. From that year onward, that percentage decreased significantly to roughly 31 percent in 2001 but increased slightly to about 36 percent in 2011. Additionally, in 1971, both figures recorded (Figures do not write numbers down.) they were equal, 50 percent, half living in owned and half in rented accommodation.

In terms of the figures (wrong word - Do not use the word "figure". Most learners do not know the special contexts for this word. ) of families dwelling in the owned home, (Did everyone live in one house?) it was just around 22 percent in 1918 and increased to about 32 percent in 1939. After that, the ratio gradually increased from 1939 to 1991 before reaching a peak of nearly 70 percent in 2001 and decreased to approximately 64 percent in 2011.


You missed the most important point - the sum of renters + owners always equals 100, so, after writing that, you can focus on either the owners or the renters. The trends will be opposite.

Note my green and orange trend lines on the diagram, which I used to describe the main features of this chart in the model essay.


The bar chart plots the percentages of families living in England and Wales who owned their own homes over the 93-year period from the end of World War I (1918) to 2011. It also plots the percentage of families who rented. Nine points in time are shown.

The total of these two values (renters and owners) adds up to 100% at each time point. Overall, home ownership increased substantially, the renters outnumbering the homeowners in the first four decades, and homeowners dominating in the last five decades. The chart can be divided into five time periods: first,1918-1939, with increasing home ownership, second,1939-1953, a period of stability, third, 1953-1991, with a rapid growth in ownership, fourth,1991-2001, a period of stability and fifth, 2001-2011, with a decline in ownership.

At the beginning of the period, 1918, 78% lived in rented housing, and the remaining 22% owned their own homes. At that time, there began a general upward trend in home ownership, increasing to a peak of 70% in 1991. There was an intervening period (1939-1953) where the percentage hovered around 33%; that is, one third of the households owned their homes and two-thirds rented. In 1953, the increase in ownership resumed. The numbers of owners and renters were equal (50% in each category) in 1971. The steepest rise in home ownership was between 1953 and 1971, increasing at a rate of about 1% per year. After another stable period, 1992-2001, the trends reversed and the percentage of home ownership declined from its peak of 70% to 65% at the end of the period, 2011. The rate of decline in the last decade was 0.5% per year.