In some countries, university students live at home, while in other countries, university students go to other cities rather than live with their family. Do you think the benefits of living away from home outweigh the disadvantages?

In several nations, those pursuing tertiary education prefer to travel to metropolises while others in other parts of the world opt to stay at home. Personally, I gravitate towards the view that the drawbacks of moving to other cities prevail upon its merits.

One of the cogent disadvantages of leaving home for other cities while attending higher education is that students are more vulnerable to several social issues such as bullying or racism. This is because when university students enter a new milieu, their parents’ support does not suffice to safeguard them against militant adults and unlawful activities. Gradually, students tend to neglect their studies at school, hence their subpar academic performances. Furthermore, it is believed that those choosing to go to other cities are prone to homesickness as time goes by. As a result, they tend to experience depressive disorders, potentially suffering from health deterioration.

Nevertheless, I aver that the disadvantages of living away from home pale in comparison with its upsides. Firstly, this may instill a sense of self-discipline and independence into students. Undoubtedly, when moving to other cities, they have to use their culinary skills and handle household chores to organize their life logically, which means they can become more attuned to an independent life earlier than their peers. Indeed, those studying and living in an alien milieu are likely to gain career progression in the future during their time contriving to assimilate themselves into the new community. This is because when they encounter a problem, they must use their initiative, achieve new skills such as problem-solving or communication skills. Thus, they can gain invaluable work-related experience and apply them into work to earn promotion more easily.

In conclusion, though moving to metropolises may afflict students concerning their well-being, I assert that the benefits of this tendency such as becoming autonomous and obtaining indispensable skills outweigh its downsides.

In several nations, those pursuing tertiary education prefer to travel to metropolises while others in other parts of the world opt to stay at home. (You did not accurately represent the task. It is not a contrast or comparison between countries. ) Personally, I gravitate towards the view that the drawbacks of moving to other cities prevail upon its merits. (That is not good English.)


One of the cogent disadvantages of leaving home to attend university for other cities while attending higher education is that students are more vulnerable to several social issues such as bullying or racism. This is because when university students enter a new milieu, (That is not good English.) their parents’ support does not suffice to cannot safeguard them against militant adults criminals and unlawful activities. (That is not logical. Are you saying that the students get beat up and robbed? That does not happen gradually. ) Gradually, students tend to neglect their studies at school, hence their subpar academic performances. Furthermore, it is believed that those choosing to go to other cities are prone to homesickness as time goes by. As a result, they tend to experience depressive disorders, potentially suffering from mental illness health deterioration.

Nevertheless, I aver that (Do not write your opinion in a body paragraph. It is in the first paragraph.) the disadvantages of living away from home pale in comparison with its upsides. (You contradicted what you wrote in the first paragraph.) Firstly, First, this may instill a sense of self-discipline and independence into students. Undoubtedly, when moving to other cities, they have to use their culinary skills and handle household chores to organize their life logically, which means they can become more attuned to an independent life earlier than their peers who lived at home. Indeed, those studying and living in an alien milieu (Not good English. ) are likely to gain career progression in the future during their time contriving to assimilate themselves (Off topic. It is not about working in another city, but studying there) into the new community. This is because when they encounter a problem, they must use their initiative, achieve new skills (Not good English) and apply their such as problem-solving or communication skills. Thus, they can gain invaluable work-related experience and apply them into work to earn promotion more easily. (off topic)

In conclusion, though moving to metropolises may afflict students concerning their well-being, (not good English) I assert that the benefits of this tendency such as becoming autonomous and obtaining indispensable skills outweigh its downsides. (You contradicted your position in the first paragraph.)


The topic is this:

When a high school graduate wants to attend university, they have two choices:

1. They select a school that is near their parents' house so they can live at home while they are attending classes.

2. They select a school that is not close enough to commute to attend classes. They will have to find accommodation in a place that is close to school. (It is not about big cities in strange places. Some universities are located in relatively small towns.)

Do you think that the benefits of choice #2 ( not living at home) outweigh its disadvantages?