The chart below reveals the total forest coverage in Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, Oceania and South America in 1990, 2000 and 2005.

To be more specific, while forest area in Asia slightly went down to 570 ha in 2002 and then rapidly climbed to 584 ha in 2005, in Europe the coverage has steeply increased from 989 to 1001 throughout the years.

Concerning the other continents, the forest area in both Oceania and North America has remained approximately the same during the period even though it showed a slighlty downward trend in both the countries.

Moreover, there had been a dramatic fall in woodlands coverage in Africa and South America, which started from 749 and 709 in 1990 and then dropped to 691 and 882 respectively in 2005.

To conclude, what clearly emerges from the graph is that, with the exception of Asia and Europe, no continent has ever shown any increase in woodlands area over the years.

I do not have the chart to make detailed remarks. However, here are my other suggestions:

The chart below reveals [displays, lists, etc ]the total forest coverage, in hectares, in Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, Oceania and South America in 1990, 2000 and 2005.

To be more specific, [That task is assumed, so you do not need to say it.] Two continents show an increase in their forest areas. [Introduce your paragraph topic.] while The forest area in Asia slightly went down slightly [after, not before the verb] [from X in 1990 ]to 570 ha in 2002 [do you mean 2000?] and then rapidly climbed to 584 ha in 2005. [New sentence] In Europe the coverage has steeply increased steeply from 989 in 1990 [?] to 1001 in 2005 throughout the years.

Concerning the other continents On the other hand, the forest area in both Oceania and North America has remained approximately the same during the period even though it showed a slightly downward trend in both areas the countries. [Neither is a country, so you need another term.]

Moreover, Finally, there was had been a dramatic fall in woodlands coverage in Africa and South America, which started going from 749 and 709 in 1990 and then dropping ed to 691 and 882, respectively, in 2005.

To conclude, what clearly emerges from the graph is that, with the exception of Asia and Europe, no continental area has ever shows n any increase in woodlands area over the period in question/under discussion. years.

I hope this helps.