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Good day all...

Can any one remove y confusion with those sentences and answer my questions...

I am grateful...

His hand is bent under the table.
His hand bent under the table.

I want (is bent) to give the meaning that his hand is bent, not passive, but to use past participle (bent) as an adjective (like we have: his hand is black, his eyes are blue)?

The sticks are pierced into earth.
The sticks pierced into earth.

The first one is passive, but in the second one I want (pierced) to be as an adjective not verb, the sticks pierced into the ground not they pierced (the past of pierce), here I get confused how to express what I want?

It that correct to say:

Whenever broken it cannot be repaired

Omit the (it is) in the passive voice. I feel the origin of the sentence is:

Whenever it is broken it cannot be repaired.

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There is no pupil in the class.
There is not any pupil in the class.

You will get better if you have received any medication.
You will get better if you have received a medication.
You will get better if you have ever received a medication.

Are those correct grammatically? What is the difference between them?
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What a place this world would be.
What a place this world could be.

Are both correct grammatically? But both have different meaning. What is the difference between the meanings?

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Politics is a dirty business, and she knew that before she entered the fray.

Politics is a dirty business, and she knew that before she has/had entered the fray.

Are both correct grammatically ? but both have different meaning.

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Cannot stand this woman glad she has gone hate he.
Cannot stand this woman glad she is gone hate he.

Are both correct grammatically ? but both have different meanings?

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Some genius scratched the (stop smoking cigarette) warning and I fell for it.

A genius person scratched the (stop smoking cigarette) warning and I fell for it.

A genius one scratched the (stop smoking cigarette) warning and I fell for it.

Are all correct ? which one is familiar to the natives?

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Did not say anything
Say nothing

The police will do nothing
The police won’t do anything

Are those have the same meaning? Which one is more familiar to natives?
But hard though it is to believe,
Though it is hard to believe

What is the difference of meaning between the?
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We’ve heard all sorts of reports of small group girls running wild at the school and its impacted on everybody else.

I read this from a website, I feel it is not correct! Am I right?

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We’re absolutely astounded at what happened to Levenshulme

We’re absolutely astounded by what happened to Levenshulme

If both are correct, what is the difference between them in meaning?

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Windfall in profits since the election.
Windfall of profits since the election.

Is there difference in meaning between them?

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Did the NHS not cure them?
Did not the NHS cure them?

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without disruption, similarity, portrayal, adjust or interpretation
A school without pupils, lessons, books, desks and blackboard.
A school without pupils, lessons, books, desks and blackboard.

1-I want to give the meaning that the school is without all what mentioned, i.e. there is no lessons, pupils….. do I have to repeat (without) with every word ?
Like this sentence:
A school without pupils, without lessons, without books, without desks and without blackboard.

2 : If I put (and) or (or) does the meaning changes ? or it is giving the same meaning that the school is without all of what mentioned.

The guard is there every hour, every day, every week, every month and every year.
The guard is there every hour, day, week, month and year.

Do I have to repeat (every) with each one?
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The sentences, "His hand is bent under the table." and "His hand bent under the table." are both grammatical, but they're confusing, because the verb "bend" and the noun "hand" are usually not used together like this. This is a usage problem rather than a grammatical problem. Without context, it is difficult to understand what the person is doing with his hand.

If I understand your meaning correctly, you'd more likely hear something like:

His hand slipped/fell under the table.

His hand is concealed/hidden under the table.

The sentences, "The sticks are pierced into earth." and "The sticks pierced into earth.", are both grammatical. If I understand your meaning correctly, you might also hear something like:

The sticks are stuck/pounded/shoved/poked into the ground.

The sticks are sticking/protruding out of the ground.

The sentences, "Whenever broken it cannot be repaired." and "Whenever it is broken it cannot be repaired.", are both grammatical, but it is difficult to see how they would be used in real life speech. If I understand your meaning correctly, you'd more likely hear something like:

If it breaks, it can't be repaired.

The sentences, "There is no pupil in the class." and "There is not any pupil in the class.", are both grammatical, but not natural-sounding. If I understand your meaning correctly, you'd more likely hear something like:

Not one pupil showed up for class.

The last three sentences, "You will get better....", are all grammatical, but not natural-sounding. If I understand your meaning correctly, you'd more likely hear something like:

You will get better if you have received the right medication.
The sentences, "What a place...", are both grammatical, but in real speech there would typically be more to this, for example:

What a place this world would/could be if everybody respected everyone else.

Of the two sentences you listed, "Politics is a dirty business...", only the first is correct. The second sentence with "has/had entered" is ungrammatical.

The two sentences you listed, "Cannot stand this woman...", are both ungrammatical. If I understand your meaning correctly, they should be something like:

"I cannot stand this woman, and I'm glad she has/is gone," said he, full of hate.

The three sentences you listed, "Some/a genius...", are all grammatical but not natural-sounding. If I understand your meaning correctly, you'd more likely hear something like:

Someone removed the no-smoking sign in the no-smoking area, and I didn't realize it and lighted up.

The four sentences you listed, "Did not say... The police...", are all grammatical, but they would typically be joined together, for example:

Say nothing. The police won't do anything.

I did not say anything. The police will do nothing.
Thank you very much. I am grateful.
An0nymousThe sentences, "His hand is bent under the table." and "His hand bent under the table." are both grammatical, but they're confusing, because the verb "bend" and the noun "hand" are usually not used together like this. This is a usage problem rather than a grammatical problem. Without context, it is difficult to understand what the person is doing with his hand.
My problem here is the adjective usage of those past participle forms of the verb.
What about:
His hand is hidden under the table.
His hand hidden under the table.
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The two phrases you listed, "But hard though...Though it is hard...", are grammatical. They are not complete sentences. You'd typically hear them used something like:

But hard though it is to believer/Though it is hard to believe, I will accept his version of what happened.

The sentence you listed, "We've heard all sorts of reports....", should be: "We've heard all sorts of reports of small groups of girls running wild at the school, and it's impacted on everyone else."

The two sentences you listed, "We're absolutely astounded at/by...", are both correct and mean the same thing.

The two phrases you listed, "Windfall...", are both correct and mean the same thing. They typically be used in a sentence such as: "There's been a windfall in/of profits since the election."

The two sentences you listed, 'Did the NHS...Did not the NHS...", are both grammatical and mean the same thing.

You can say: "This is a school without pupils, lessons, books, desks, or blackboards." You don't have to repeat the word "without." You don't have to put the words "and" or "or" in repeatedly.

You can say: "The guard is there every hour, of every day, of every week, of every month, of every year."
His hand is hidden under the table. Good
His hand, hidden under the table, held the ace of spades.
The sentence, "His hand is hidden under the table.", is correct.

"His hand hidden under the table." is not a complete sentence. It would be okay if used, for example, in the following way:

"His hand, hidden under the table, was no longer visible."
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