I went to Office Depot to buy a computer mouse. The saleslady said that "Computer mice" are upstairs. I said, "The plural of 'mouse' when referring to computers is 'mouses' ". She said her boss told her it was "mice". I told her I was sure I was right. When I got home I did a Google advanced search and found the term "mice" used a lot and "mouses" not used at all. I can't exactly explain why, but I know in my heart I am right. The plural isn't "mice" and I don't look for them in the "rodent" section of the store, both for the same reason a computer "mouse" isn't a real mouse.
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(Email Removed) (Rushtown) burbled
I went to Office Depot to buy a computer mouse. The saleslady said that "Computer mice" are upstairs. I said, ... for them in the "rodent" section of the store, both for the same reason a computer "mouse" isn't a real mouse.

I thought the plural was "computer pointing devices".
I went to Office Depot to buy a computer mouse. The saleslady said that "Computer mice" are upstairs. I said, "The plural of 'mouse' when referring to computers is 'mouses' ". She said her boss told her it was "mice".

Ah, these foreign guest workers, who don't know the plurals of English words, and have to ask their bosses.
Maybe her boss is a biologist in his day job.
Ask her if her boss also told her that the plural of "antenna" is "antennae." Following the same logic.
\\P. Schultz
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I went to Office Depot to buy a computer mouse. ... She said her boss told her it was "mice".

Ah, these foreign guest workers, who don't know the plurals of English words, and have to ask their bosses. Maybe ... job. Ask her if her boss also told her that the plural of "antenna" is "antennae." Following the same logic.

Gosh, you two are a real hoot. Two of a kind.

Skitt (in SF Bay Area)
Gosh, you two are a real hoot.

No, we are two separate heet.
\\P. Schultz
I went to Office Depot to buy a computer mouse. The saleslady said that "Computer mice" are upstairs. I said, ... look for them in the "rodent" section of thestore, both for the same reason a computer "mouse" isn't a real mouse.

Your logic is flawed but I too prefer "mouses". As you've noticed, we're in the minority. C'est la guerre.
Adrian
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I went to Office Depot to buy a computer mouse. The saleslady said that "Computer mice" are upstairs. I said, ... for them in the "rodent" section of the store, both for the same reason a computer "mouse" isn't a real mouse.

The plural of mouse is mice , just like the ones cats chew on. It's not mouses . Windows 98 for Dummies , by Andy Rathbone

When the devices were new, a friend of mine spontaneously referred to them as mouses, and then wondered why he had done so. I was able to point out to him an obscure rule of English grammar, that when an irregular noun takes on a new meaning, it gets a chance to take on a regular plural in that meaning. If I wished to insult a group of people in a mildly old-fashioned way, I would be more likely to call them a bunch of low-lifes or louses than low-lives or lice. Likewise, still-lifes (paintings), the Toronto Maple Leafs, gooses (the tailors' tools and the rude pokes), etc.
So there is nothing wrong with the Sprachgefühl of the people who come up with "mouses"; but usage does seem to have settled on "mice" in this case.

Joe Fineman (Email Removed)
When the devices were new, a friend of mine spontaneously referred to them as mouses, and then wondered why he ... than low-lives or lice. Likewise, still-lifes (paintings), the Toronto Maple Leafs, gooses (the tailors' tools and the rude pokes), etc.

"Louses" and "gooses" are good examples. I'm less convinced by "low-lifes" and "still-lifes", because "life" has its ordinary meaning here, but the compound noun is not a kind of life; it's a person whose life is low or a painting whose life is still. So I don't think "lives" is really available, because you aren't pluralizing "life".
As for the Maple Leafs, I still think that's just kind of bizarre.
Your logic is flawed but I too prefer "mouses". As you've noticed, we're in the minority. C'est la guerre.

Or rather, "La paix, c'est la guerre". My mom's a French literature specialist; that's how I know that.

Christopher
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