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We can form plurals of English alphabets by adding an apostrophe and an s, e.g.

Mind your p's and q's.
Cross your t's and dot your i's.

I just want to make sure if I am right in the following:

There are two s'es in the sentence.
There are two PSes in the meeting. (PS is a short form of something.)

Am I correct?
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Comments  (Page 2) 
There are other languages with their own alphabet, but I don't know how many languages have alphabets. Perhaps another member can enlighten me. Mandarin has no alphabet.
Anyway, why we need a plural for PS? A postscript is a short remark. Although it is possible that the "short" remark is not that short and may have more than one paragraph, it is still one short remark. Two paragraphs don't make it two postscripts. I was told that an additional PS added after the original PS is PPS - Post-Postscript. (Post-postscript.)

The plural of 'postscript' is 'postscripts'. (Collin Cobuild English Dictionary for Advanced Learners)

If there is more than one letter, each with a postscript, then we have to say 'postscipts'.
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Yes, I understand that. But this usage would be very rare and most likely not in shortform.
We don't use Mandarin to refer to the Chinese language. Mandarin is one spoken dialect of the Chinese language, albeit the official one and is taught all over the country. It refers to the spoken language, not the writing. The PinYin system commonly used for Mandarin is a way to transliterate the sound.
I suppose most languages are based on alphabetical systems. Chinese and only a handful are exceptions.
PterYes, I understand that. But this usage would be very rare and most likely not in shortform.

We don't use Mandarin to refer to the Chinese language. Mandarin is one spoken dialect of the Chinese language, albeit the official one and is taught all over the country. It refers to the spoken language, not the writing. The PinYin system commonly used for Mandarin is a way to transliterate the sound.
It refers to the spoken language, not the writing. (Could you please elaborate on this? I believe Mandarin is the official Chinese dialect, both written and spoken.)
The Chinese language has many dialects. We all share the same set of characters but these characters are pronounced differently in different dialects. Same characters different pronunciations. We don't say the characters belong to any one particular dialect. They are just Chinese characters. You can't say Mandarin characters or Cantonese characters because these terms do not make sense. For example, the numbers one, two, three are written as one, two, and three horizontal strokes respectively in Chinese "一 二 三" (can you see these characters?) They are pronounced as yi1 er4 san1 in Mandarin and jat7 ji6 sam1 in Cantonese. These are not exact transliteration though. Chinese is a tonal language and the numbers are used to indicate the tone. Mandarin has four tones while Cantonese has nine (some say six depending on which method you use to indicate the tones). So, everyone can read the same Chinese book but they read them differently.
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The transliteration mentioned above is only used for teaching the Chinese language. They are not used in real communications like newspaper, letters, books or anything written normally, except Children's book or textbooks for primary students. There are only several hundred sounds in Mandarin but there are tens of thousand of Chinese characters. That's why it is not possible to "Romanize" the Chinese language and replace the Chinese characters by the Roman transliteration.
Actually, the apostrophe shouldn't be placed there. It should merely be PSs - similar to the "1980s" not "1980's"
Also - the s's looks kinda weird...maybe it's meant to be like s' or something o__O; for e.g. it's meant to be "James' wallet", as opposed to "James's wallet" <--except American spelling often utilises this form
True, Anonymous! Pluralized acronyms should not use apostrophes. As an experienced English Tutor/Mentor, apostrophes are used in possession of & in contractions (i.e., Jane's cat won't eat fish.) To place an apostrophe after an acronym or initialized words before the s, for instance, IOU's, would then cause the pluralized IOU to mean "IOU is" or "IOU possesses X" instead of IOUs as a plural (i.e., Jane owes you hundreds of IOUs!). Additionally, I always disliked the "PSS" or "P.SS" or "PPS" as a note to add an additional PS. Therefore, I've always used XPs, because, essentially it is an "Extra Postscript." Further, I've always written the sin "Ps" as a lowercase consonant since Postscript (or the Latin postscrīptum) is a single word & not two, thus: Ps. Take it for a ride sometime when/if you write a note to a friend w/ a Postscript & then have an additional afterthought, jotting down an extra Postscript (as XPs: w/ colon) & see how it feels. Cheers! Emotion: smile
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Please note that 'XP' is the anonymous poster's private usage; it does not have common currency.