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Hello, teachers!
Would you help me with these, please?

Q1. Which is correct or common, plural or singular form?
1. He farms ostriches/ostrich.
2. He has spent nearly fifty years hunting elephants/elephant in Africa.

Q2. Which expression is correct or more idiomatic?
1. Hunting lions/lion in this area is illegal.
2. Hunting lions/lion is illegal in this area.
3. Lion hunting in this area is illegal.
4. Lion hunting is illegal in this area.

Thank you very much.
Comments  
Those game and food animals which have identical singulars and plurals are relatively few, limited primarily to those beasts which were familiar in earlier centuries and are/were commonly hunted. This phenomenon among domesticated animals is very rare.

He farms sheep/fowl/fish/deer.
He hunts grouse/antelope/pheasant/buffalo/snipe/tiger in Africa/Asia/Canada.
He fishes for salmon/trout/carp/grunion/squid.

The plural with the 's' is much more common, and should be considered the 'unmarked' plural, in that it does not raise eyebrows. Consequently, since elephants were a popular big game animal, I find both 'elephants/elephant' idiomatic, but only 'ostriches' so.

As for your Q2, therefore, all are fine and I would hesitate to choose among them; but I think I would hyphenate ('lion-hunting') for clarity.
MM! Lots of thanks, as always!

Where there you are, there is an answer. Emotion: smile

Enjoy a happy weekend.
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Where you are, there is an answer


Ha, ha! Yes indeed... but is it right? Not always, I fear.

Enjoy the first signs of spring, Ms. Jandi, the plum blossoms.
Please check my thoughts.

1-1. Where there is a big city, there is always a river. [This is the commonest.]
1-2. Where a big city is, there is always a river. [This is correct but unnatural.]

2-1. Where there is Mary, there is always Tom. [This is incorrect.]
2-2. Where Mary is, there is always Tom. [This is correct.]

3-1. Where there she is, there is always Tom. [This is incorrect.]
3-2. Where she is, there is always Tom. [This is correct.]

Am I right?
I don't like 2-2 or 3-2; they are unnatural. They would be better as 'Where Mary/she is, there Tom always is'. The person comes before the verb.

I don't know why this is different for persons and things. Maybe someone else does.
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Q1. Which is correct or common, plural or singular form?
1. He farms corn and soybeans. He has an ostrich farm
2. He [omit:has] spent nearly fifty years hunting elephants in Africa.

Q2. Which expression is correct or more idiomatic?
ok:->1. Hunting lions in this area is illegal.
just ugly->2. Hunting lions is illegal in this area.
Better: It is illegal to hunt lions in this area.

bad:3. Lion hunting in this area is illegal.
bad:4. Lion hunting is illegal in this area
Could you tell us precisely what you think is incorrect about these, Riddick? (Other than your idea of beauty, that is)--

1. He farms ostriches.
2. He has spent nearly fifty years hunting elephants/elephant in Africa.

1. Hunting lions/lion in this area is illegal.
2. Hunting lions/lion is illegal in this area.
3. Lion hunting in this area is illegal.
4. Lion hunting is illegal in this area.
what is the plural form of ostrich?
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