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Hi there,

I am not a native english speaker and I find myself in a controversy discussion with a friend wether or not it is possible to use "there is" and "here is" with a plural subject, for example:

"There is some things I'd like to talk about."

"Here is your letters."

I looked for appropriate grammars or idioms via google, but failed to find anything conclusive.

I think it is just bad english (i.e. not even slang) and therefore all these sentences should use "are" instead of "is". But I also found a hint, that it might be allowed when offering something (see http://www.sulinet.hu/nyelvek/?p=content&id=762 ).

However, my friend was in the U.S. quite often and always for more than a month. He has the impression, that this use of "(t)here is" with plural subjects seems to be quite common.

So, today we watched a DVD of movie "Absolute Power" with english subtitles turned on, and there actually was the sentence "There is some things I'd like to talk about." written (and spoken), which actually was the cause for us to come up with this discussion.

Please help us to decide: Is it just a common mistake, that even native english speakers make, or is it actually correct english, and if so, when is it appropriate to use this form.

Thanks in advance

Ralf
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Anon:
You're a bit tardy. CJ's post was nearly 2 years ago, and he remarked that the original was 4 years before his.
I believe this type of grammar is more often used with GROUPS of things and uncountable nouns.

Example "Here is the paperwork you asked for." / "Here's all of the papers you asked for."

As another person responded, it sounds more natural to use

APOSTROPHE + S (like the example above) because it is easier to pronounce than the correct way. It is grammatically incorrect but a habit we form in speaking.

However, is + plural noun sounds terrible and I can't believe it was in a movie!
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Thank you for your post 5 years ago.
I must agree that this singular/plural disagreement is 'just damned wrong, formal or informal'. While some may argue that it is permissible in speech if not text, I find that it is such a distraction that, for a moment, I lose the thread of the person's discourse. In the main, it indicates a lack of planning before speaking -- did you begin thinking of a singular object only to change your mind in midstream but not bother to amend your opening? If so this suggests a lack of credibility on the part of the speaker. Although I agree that language is an evolving tool, there are certain minimums that are in place to assure comprehension. Certainly context is the most important when determining meaning, but it must be enormously frustrating for those for whom English is not their first language to learn that there is this casual disregard of basic grammar by native speakers. I feel so strongly about this that, when I have caught myself in the midst of making this mistake, I correct myself in speech even though this may be rather clumsy at that moment. Maintaining precision in this age of lax grammatical standards may seem somewhat pedantic but we should remind ourselves that we are the stewards of the language, and passing it on to our descendants relatively intact is as much a part of being civilized as any other aspect of organized thinking.
By the way, I am writing this in 2012 -- some topics have no sell-by date.
Mr. Micawber, shame on you. There is should only be used with singular subjects, there are with plural. The informal there's does not change the game. "There is twenty people " is just plain ugly to the ear and to real grammarians. And the contracted form is just as bad.
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Thank you to those who have posted about how 'there's' or the like is just plain wrong. It offends my ears regularly and I am in despair that it seems to be accepted usage now. It sounds so dreadfully wrong to me but most people I mention it to don't know what I'm talking about. I am in New Zealand where I have observed incorrect usage of this contraction on the national tv news, in newspapers and in printed material from large corporations.Do I just need to accept it? No-one else seems bothered!
Greetings from North Carolina, United States in 2012. I also perceive that the usage of "there's" or "here's" with a plural subject is becoming increasingly common among educated people in the news media who ought to know better. The incongruity is illogical and, as another pointed out, just plain ugly. I even email major broadcast news organizations to make them aware of the sloppiness of their speech.

In the future, Americans won't have this problem, as they will be speaking Spanish, though this will probably occur after my lifetime!
I must agree that this singular/plural disagreement is 'just damned wrong, formal or informal'. While some may argue that it is permissible in speech if not text, I find that it is such a distraction that, for a moment, I lose the thread of the person's discourse. In the main, it indicates a lack of planning before speaking -- did you begin thinking of a singular object only to change your mind in midstream but not bother to amend your opening? If so this suggests a lack of credibility on the part of the speaker. Although I agree that language is an evolving tool, there are certain minimums that are in place to assure comprehension. Certainly context is the most important when determining meaning, but it must be enormously frustrating for those for whom English is not their first language to learn that there is this casual disregard of basic grammar by native speakers. I feel so strongly about this that, when I have caught myself in the midst of making this mistake, I correct myself in speech even though this may be rather clumsy at that moment. Maintaining precision in this age of lax grammatical standards may seem somewhat pedantic but we should remind ourselves that we are the stewards of the language, and passing it on to our descendants relatively intact is as much a part of being civilized as any other aspect of organized thinking.
By the way, I am writing this in 2012 -- some topics have no sell-by date.
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