By making the plural form for nouns ending with "f", when do I need to change "f" into "ves"?
Here are some words with "f" as ending:
wife
scarf
knife
leaf
etc.
Thanks!
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By making the plural form for nouns ending with "f", when do I need to change "f" into "ves"? Here are some words with "f" as ending: wife scarf knife leaf etc.

Well, actually, you change the "f" to "ve" and add "s" to form the plural, but you have the right idea. The answer to your question, unfortunately, is "Most of the time, but not always" Many words can be pluralized either by the switch to "ve" or by just adding "s". "Scarf" is such a word; its plural can be either "scarves" or "scarfs". "Roof" is another, and I'm sure there are more. The only way to be sure is to check a good dictionary, preferably English-only. Also, the rule does not apply to words ending in "ff". They are pluralized with a simple "s" "muffs", "riffs".

You might want to check out this site for some simple rules about pluralizing:
. Words ending in "f" are covered by rule 5. But don't forget to check the dictionary if in doubt.

Bob Lieblich
Singular fellow
By making the plural form for nouns ending with "f", when do I need to change "f" into "ves"? Here are some words with "f" as ending: wife scarf knife leaf etc.

When it is correct. Consider "waifs".
GFH
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By making the plural form for nouns ending with "f", ... words with "f" as ending: wife scarf knife leaf etc.

When it is correct. Consider "waifs".

I submit the most commonly used "f" to "ves" word: life/lives.
By making the plural form for nouns ending with "f", when do I need to change "f" into "ves"?

Also, the rule does not apply to words ending in "ff". They are pluralized with a simple "s" "muffs", "riffs".

Except staff, pl. staves or staffs.
You might want to check out this site for some simple rules about pluralizing: . Words ending in "f" are covered by rule 5.

"5. Many nouns ending in f or fe are made plural by changing f or fe to ves. knife - knives scarf - scarves wife - wives"

"Many nouns" in other words, you just have to learn which ones.
But don't forget to check the dictionary if in doubt.

Now that sums it up perfectly!

Leila: "What if he's innocent?"
Agent Rogersz: "No one is innocent."
When it is correct. Consider "waifs".

I submit the most commonly used "f" to "ves" word: life/lives.

Not to be applied to 'fife' though!
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I submit the most commonly used "f" to "ves" word: life/lives.

Not to be applied to 'fife' though!

Right.
A word that I learned: "handkerchief->-chieves.
But never have heard "chief->chieves", though I have heard "thief->thieves".
I learned "hoof-> hooves", at just about the same time I saw this book title in a library (1949 or '50): Flying Hoofs.
Why "achieves", but not "achief". Just kidding.
By making the plural form for nouns ending with "f", ... words with "f" as ending: wife scarf knife leaf etc.

Well, actually, you change the "f" to "ve" and add "s" to form the plural, but you have the right ... such a word; its plural can be either "scarves" or "scarfs". "Roof" is another, and I'm sure there are more.

Hunh? "Roofs" is /always/ spelled with an 'f'.
By making the plural form for nouns ending with "f", ... words with "f" as ending: wife scarf knife leaf etc.

When it is correct. Consider "waifs".

I'd rather not. I prefer my models to have a bit more meat on them.

(And I'm not getting involved in an 'f'-word discussion).
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
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