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What is the plural of "Associate General Counsel?" "Counsel" is plural. I need to know where to find the rule that governs this, please.

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Have you checked your dictionary.?

4a plural counsel

(1) : a lawyer engaged in the trial or management of a case in court (2) : a lawyer appointed to advise and represent in legal matters an individual client or a corporate and especially a public body https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/counsel Clive
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anonymouswhere to find the rule that governs this

You might Google

English grammar plural

or something like that, and see what you get.

Eventually you'll find something that says, in one way or another, that you're supposed to pluralize the head noun of a noun phrase. Modifying nouns and/or adjectives are not pluralized.

mother-in-law > mothers-in-law
adjutant general > adjutants general
Associate General Counsel > Associate General Counsels

anonymous "Counsel" is plural.

What do you mean by this? The word "counsel" looks singular to me. Why are you saying it's plural?

CJ

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Comments  
CalifJimWhat do you mean by this? The word "counsel" looks singular to me. Why are you saying it's plural?

Because it's noted in the dictionaries as plural in the sense "counsel for the defense"

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/counsel


3. (used with a sing. or pl. v.) the lawyer or lawyers representing one party or the other in court.

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AlpheccaStarsBecause it's noted in the dictionaries as plural in the sense "counsel for the defense"

Yes, I saw that later in Clive's link, but I still can't get my head around it. That is, if the OP says Counsel is plural, asking what its plural is seems pointless, so I'm going to drop out of this thread.

CJ

CalifJimasking what its plural is seems pointless.

Legalese has its own mysterious ways.

It's singular when it's modified by an individual attorney's title, so when referencing multiple individuals as such, it's "counsels." My title is "Assistant General Counsel." I would say "I am one of five Assistant General Counsels at the downtown office of the General Counsel." But when we're working as a team on one matter, "we are counsel for the defendant." Capitalization is a clue to whether it's singular or plural.

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