+0
Hi there,

I always get stuck on this type of sentence:

Component A, together with component B, IS/ARE referred to as Component C.

Does the verb agree with component A only, or component A and B together?

This one doesn't seem as confusing for some reason:

Sally, together with Bob, IS running the fair.

I can't figure out why or what the rule is.. Any help is greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Marta
+0
This is interesting...
I think that "together with somebody/something" is something that is mentioned in addition, and it's not really part of the subject.

Component A, together with component B, is referred to as C.
(Although it might sound like component A is the main component and component B is secondary, depending on the context... I guess)

I wouldn't rule out the possibility that a plural verb could occur in speech in such structures (because of notional agreement), but if you wanted to use a plural verb maybe this would be better:

Component A and component B together are referred to as C.

Just my opinion. I'm not a native speaker, but I am interested in the question.
+0
AnonymousI always get stuck on this type of sentence:

Component A, together with component B, IS/ARE referred to as Component C.
A, together with B, is ...
A, as well as B, is ...
A, in addition to B, is ...
A and B are ...
A and B taken together are ...

CJ
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Comments  
You are certainly not the first person with questions about agreement in instances such as this one.
I can contribute one bit of information. If together with introduces a parenthetical phrase, as some suggest it always does, then the singular subject takes the singular verb.
Do you have an example that might call for the plural verb?
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
What about A, B, C as well as D, are/is?

Secondly, in the above, is D linked to just C or A, B and C?

also, is there really any difference between 'and' and 'as well as'

thanks Anton.
http://www.grammarbook.com/grammar/subjectVerbAgree.asp

See especially Rule 7.
___

A, B, and C, as well as D, are ...
___

Google: English grammar agreement singular plural

and you will find lots of discussions on this topic.

CJ