An American text has: Lincoln pocket-vetoed the Wade-Davis Bill (by not signing it), which angered his congressional critics and left the Ten-Percent Plan as the official, if vague, blueprint for Reconstruction.
Two questions: what is the different between pocket-veto and a 'normal' veto? Why "pocket-"?
Why use the word blueprint instead of just the word 'plan'? is there a kind of a subtle meaning of this in English?
Any comments are welcome which contribute to the understanding of the questions.
Two questions: what is the different between pocket-veto and a 'normal' veto? Why "pocket-"?

A pocket veto is implicit rather than explicit: The President simply does nothing with a bill that is sent to him less than ten days before Congress adjourns. It's as if he just stuck it in his pocket.
Why use the word blueprint instead of just the word 'plan'?

It suggests completeness and precision.
¬R / Darla: Leftovers aren't the mark of a man. \ www.bestweb.net/~notr Andrew Reid: Actually, they are, because that's how men's shirts button.
It is also possible that it is an instance of "elegant variation". The use of "blueprint" avoids the repetition of "plan" in "...and left the Ten-Percent Plan as the official, if vague, blueprint...". http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elegant variation

Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.english.usage)
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Of course - thank you very much, indeed.
It's not exactly clear whether the "congressional critcs" were angry because he vetoed it, or because he chose the stealth method. (Woops! I just stuck it in my pocket and forgot all about it! My bad!)

A vague blueprint is something of an oxymoron. The use of "blueprint" over "plan" is usually intended to emphasize the presence of detail.