An associate of mine referred to the stand he was speaking at as a "podium." I asked him if he didn't mean "lectern" as "podium" refers to a platform. He claims that the term "podium" can be used nowadays to refer to a stand and he later told me that his home dictionary (I don't know the name of the dictionary) bore out his usage of "podium" to refer to a stand as acceptable. The dictionaries I own do not support this usage and I was wondering how prevalent the usage of "podium" as "stand" has become.
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An associate of mine referred to the stand he was speaking at as a "podium." I asked him if he ... own do not support this usage and I was wondering how prevalent the usage of "podium" as "stand" has become.

Sounds fine to me. The AHD gives: "2. a stand for holding the notes of a public speaker; a lectern."
Peter
to refer to a stand as acceptable. The dictionaries I own do not support this usage and I was wondering how prevalent the usage of "podium" as "stand" has become.

Fewer and fewer people seem to even know the word "lectern." I can't even remember the last time I heard it called a lectern when I wasn't the one calling it that.

Dena Jo
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...
} Sounds fine to me. The AHD gives: "2. a stand for holding the notes of a } public speaker; a lectern."
That'd be AHD3 or worse. AHD doesn't have that. Ask Aaron. Look to AHD3 and MW3 for sympathy, not for word usage.

R. J. Valentine
An associate of mine referred to the stand he was speaking at as a "podium." I asked him if he ... own do not support this usage and I was wondering how prevalent the usage of "podium" as "stand" has become.

The manager at a Denny's referred to it as a "podium" while speaking to a group of people; I took him aside and explained the distinction, whereupon he said "It says podium in the Operations Manual and that's what I'm using."

Gary G. Taylor * Rialto, CA
gary at donavan dot org / http:// geetee dot donavan dot org "The two most abundant things in the universe
are hydrogen and stupidity." Harlan Ellison
...
He claims that the term "podium" can be used nowadays to refer to a stand and he later told me ... own do not support this usage and I was wondering how prevalent the usage of "podium" as "stand" has become.

Prevalent enough. "Podium" is longer than "stand", sounds less English than either "stand" or "counter", and until very recently was unknown to part of the population, making it the best choice for pseudo-genteel cutesytalk. It was adopted as the standard word for the counter at the airport gates and also the regular ticket counter, and has been adopted by the typical middle-class "nice" talk, along with "momentarily" (we'll be taking off momentarily, which does not mean we'll land a minute later), "smoking materials" (ie cigarettes), "air sickness" (my neighbor said last week she was "airsick" to mean she felt like puking, in her non-flying living room), "intermediate destination" etc.
And, as predicted, the cashier at a new fast-food joint told me I could pick up my sandwich at the "podium".
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An associate of mine referred to the stand he was speaking at as a "podium." I asked him if he ... own do not support this usage and I was wondering how prevalent the usage of "podium" as "stand" has become.

Perhaps the confusion started because a lectern is usually mounted on a shallow podium. I've heard "podium" used in the UK for the large display stands at an exhibition, but it seems odd to me: "podium" suggests a smallish platform on which someone stands to make a speech.

In the city of Bath there is a sort of shopping mall called "The Podium" - I have no idea why. It encompasses an underground car park, a Waitrose supermarket, a dozen or so small shops and caf├ęs, and the public library. I've never heard an orator at work there.
Alan Jones
All the world is a podium.

Ron Hardin
On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
On 28 Oct 2003 03:15:10 GMT, Dena Jo
to refer to a stand as acceptable. The dictionaries I ... how prevalent the usage of "podium" as "stand" has become.

Fewer and fewer people seem to even know the word "lectern." I can't even remember the last time I heard it called a lectern when I wasn't the one calling it that.

Perhaps these fewer and fewer people know it but prefer the better version: podium. "Lectern" is a pissant word and it surprises me little you rarely hear it. Me, I wouldn't be caught dead saying it. But I know the word.

Charles Riggs
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