Podium - SANSKRIT IN TODAY'S WORLD
By Dr V. R. Panchamukhi
The Hindustan Times
Saturday, March 13, 1999
The fact that Sanskrit language, the rules of its grammar and the shabdabodh are of great utility in the development of computer language has been acknowledged by many computer experts in USA and Europe.
Computer experts such as Dr Riq Briggs, Dr Vyas Housten and Dr David Lavin have written extensively bringing out the usefulness of Sanskrit language in developing computer software. There are also many Indian experts and institutions, like the C—DAC, which have been researching on this subject of the use of Sanskrit in developing computer software. We can go to the extent of putting out a statement that “if you want to learn computer language then learn Sanskrit language.” However, this field has not received as much extensive support and development as it deserves.

Usefulness of Sanskrit literature for modern times can be demonstrated in two ways. Firstly, by unravelling the basic knowledge and wisdom that is contained in Sanskrit literature to the world, and by working out new theories and paradigms of knowledge that can be built on the basis of the principles laid down in Sanskrit literature.
Even though the knowledge of Ayurveda forms part of Sanskrit literature, there have not been many initiatives to demonstrate its validity to the modern world through modern means of validation and communication. The schism that exists between the traditional Ayurveda and the modern world, is responsible for the absence of pro-active initiatives for safeguarding the advantages of indigenous knowledge. The Ayurvedic world should establish R&D centres, adopt the modern approach of validation, pilot testing, etc and complete the paper work for patenting their unique formulations. For this purpose the institutional facilitation for preparing the traditional world to interact with the modern world and also facilitating patent registration, pilot testing and commercialisation need to be strengthened.
In order to eliminate the negative attitude towards Sanskrit from our midst, we must remove the fear that Sanskrit is a difficult language. In this context, the commendable work being done by a voluntary organisation called Sanskrit Bharati to conduct Sanskrit conversation classes deserves special mention. Such programmes should be conducted on an extensive basis in different parts of the country.
Here are five ways for bringing Sanskrit to the centre-stage of our cultural and intellectual pursuits.
o we should encourage basic research on the linkages that exist between Sanskrit and science and launch innovative activities to bridge the gap between Sanskrit and the Modern World.

o encourage research and debate the application of Sanskrit in the development of computer software for language processing.

o produce documentaries and TV serials in simple Sanskrit for telecast.
o set up computer based networking among Sanskrit institutions and Sanskrit manuscript libraries for improving the communications among Sanskrit scholars and researchers.The Rashtriya Sanskrit Vidyapeeth, Tirupati, proposes to launch a SANSK-NET Software for this purpose. o finally, we should change the teaching methodology and launch innovative schemes for teaching people Sanskrit conversation.
(Excerpt from a broadcast talk by Dr V. R. Panchamukhi, Chancellor of the Rashtriya Sanskrit Vidyapeeth, Tirupati).
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Om Shanti
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o Not for commercial use. Solely to be fairly used for the educational purposes of research and open discussion. The contents of this post may not have been authored by, and do not necessarily represent the opinion of the poster. The contents are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works. o If you send private e-mail to me, it will likely not be read, considered or answered if it does not contain your full legal name, current e-mail and postal addresses, and live-voice telephone number. o Posted for information and discussion. Views expressed by others are not necessarily those of the poster.
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I thought Sanskrit was as dead as Latin. Why not just speak Hindi?
I thought Sanskrit was as dead as Latin. Why not just speak Hindi?

Sanskrit is brain-dead and in a vegetative state, but its bodily functions (elimination, mainly) are being kept alive artificially.

\\P. Schultz
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I thought Sanskrit was as dead as Latin. . . .

Sanskrit Not a 'Dead' Language - HC
By Legal Correspondent
The Hindu
January 2, 1998
The Madras High Court has held that "Sanskrit is not a dead language" and observed that the reasoning of the Tamil Nadu Government that Sanskrit had ceased to be a language in use "is nothing but ignorance of reality."
Mr. Justice S. S. Subramani, allowing a writ petition, referred to, a Supreme Court decision, according to which. Sanskrit was the mother of all Indo-Aryan languages and it was this language in which our Vedas, Puranas and Upanishads had been written and in which Kalidas, Bhavbuti, Banabhatta and Dandi wrote their classics.
The judge, in a recent order, also said that the teachings of Sankaracharya, Ramanuja, Madhwacharya. Nimbark and Vallabhacharya would not have been woven into the fabric of Indian culture, if Sanskrit would not have been available to them as a medium of expressing their thoughts.
The judge pointed out that the Sanskrit Commission, in its report, had observed that "in Chennal itself, it (Commission) found that both in unrecognised schools and private classes, non- Brahmins and even a few Muslims and Christians, studied Sanskrit. In one of the high schools of Chidambaram, a Muslim student was reported to have stood first in Sanskrit and in another school, there were Harijans among Sanskrit students."
The Commission, the judge said, also observed that there was an awakening of the cultural consciousness and a keen awareness of the importance of Sanskrit among people and in almost all cities and important towns there were privately organised associations for promotion of Sanskrit.
The judge noted that the, apex court which discussed the Commission's report had explained as to how the Government of India had taken a policy decision for promoting Sanskrit and how for propagating secularism, Sanskrit had played and continued to play an important part.
The State Education Secretary, the judge said, had not considered any of the above facts and simply said that Sanskrit was a dead language. It could not be true in view of the various pronouncements of the Supreme Court, the judge said and held that Sanskrit was not a dead language.
The judge quashed the order passed by the Education Secretary, rejecting the application of Bala Seva Educational and Charitable Trust, which sought minority status for the college run by it.

The judge directed the respondents to reconsider the entire matter and pass final orders on the petitioner's application within a month.
The petitioner-Trust applied to the Government on June 25 seeking minority status to its engineering college, on the ground that all the trustees were well versed in Sanskrit and committed to the cause of establishing Sanskrit as an important means of communication in view of its intrinsic capability of being adopted to modern technology. By an order dated August 13, the claim of the Trust was rejected on the ground that Sanskrit language had ceased to be in use. It was this order that was challenged by the Trust.
Courtesy of the Hindu Vivek Kendr
Jai Maharaj
http://www.mantra.com/jai
Om Shanti
Panchaang for 10 Phalgun 5104, Monday, March 1, 2004:

Shubhanu Nama Samvatsare Uttarayane Moksh Ritau
Kumbh Mase Shukl Pakshe Indu Vasara Yuktayam
Ardr-Punarvasu Nakshatr Ayushman Yog
Gar-Vanij Karan Dashami-Ekadashi Yam Tithau
Hindu Holocaust Museum
http://www.mantra.com/holocaust
Hindu life, principles, spirituality and philosophy http://www.hindu.org
http://www.hindunet.org
The truth about Islam and Muslims
http://www.flex.com/~jai/satyamevajayate
o Not for commercial use. Solely to be fairly used for the educational purposes of research and open discussion. The contents of this post may not have been authored by, and do not necessarily represent the opinion of the poster. The contents are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works. o If you send private e-mail to me, it will likely not be read, considered or answered if it does not contain your full legal name, current e-mail and postal addresses, and live-voice telephone number. o Posted for information and discussion. Views expressed by others are not necessarily those of the poster.
I thought Sanskrit was as dead as Latin. Why not just speak Hindi?

Sanskrit is still alive in Hindu rituals.
Goto a Hindu wedding or temple , and the shlokas recited are usually in pure Sanskrit.
Of course , most Indians speak Hindi(which is quite close to sanskrit) or English for conversing with each other but Hindu scriptures like Vedas, Upanishads are written in Sanskrit. Right now Sanskrit is co-existing quite well with other languages.
Podium - SANSKRIT IN TODAY'S WORLD By Dr V. R. Panchamukhi The Hindustan Times Saturday, March 13, 1999 The fact ... the development of computer language has been acknowledged by many computer experts in USA and Europe.Don't keep us in suspense.

Cut the verbiage and tell us: what *is* the Sanskrit for "podium"?

And why is it important for English usage?

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
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Podium - SANSKRIT IN TODAY'S WORLD By Dr V. R. ... been acknowledged by many computer experts in USA and Europe.

Don't keep us in suspense. Cut the verbiage and tell us: what *is* the Sanskrit for "podium"? And why is it important for English usage?

It is not useful to English usage. It is useful to computer usage. English is a weird language just like people who speak it. They don't follow any common sense. For example, 'put' is 'put' but 'but' is 'bat'. First, straighten this stupidy so that sensible people can understand it let alone computers.
I thought Sanskrit was as dead as Latin. Why not just speak Hindi?

Sanskrit is still alive in Hindu rituals.

Yeah, and Latin is alive in some Catholic rituals. In other words, it's dead.

\\P. Schultz
'but' is 'bat'.

"But" is "bat" only to those who don't know English very well. Better hit the books, bub.
\\P. Schultz
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