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Can any tell me how to read stressed and unstressed syllables so i can read the metre of poems.

I read this example somewhere;

'Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?'
'Shall I comPARE thee TO a SUMMer's DAY?'

(da-DUM da-DUM da-DUM da DUM da DUM)

When i read this i realised i didnt know which words/syllables were stressed and those which werent. Even when i tried it aloud i dont get the stress so that its so noticable or i dont differentiate between the two.

If any one has a guide or some-such-thing to help, (not a guide to the different metres), that would be great.

thanks
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I'm not sure what your problem is. You seem to have those stresses correct (that is called 'iambic pentameter'-- 5 repetitions of soft-hard.

When you recite, however, you should not worry about the meter so much; try to read it as natural conversation. Consider the meanings of the words you are speaking. Good poetry subdues the metrics to the meaning.
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Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Mister MicawberI'm not sure what your problem is. You seem to have those stresses correct (that is called 'iambic pentameter'-- 5 repetitions of soft-hard.When you recite

Thanks Mister Micawber for replying and sorry mine has taken so long.

But the problem is i would like to improve my poerty by learning how to write with the different metres, and i cant do this without knowing which words are stressed and which are not. That example i gave ("shall i compare thee to a summers day?") was to demonstrate not what i know but what i dont. i mean its something i've pasted .

to explain better - hopefully;

'Shall I comPARE thee TO a SUMMer's DAY'

shall - to me there seems to be a stress on the 'all' or 'll' or even the 'sh'

'I' - i wouldnt of guessed I was a strressed unit

'compare' - i hear the stresses in the 'com' and the 'pare'; the 'omm' and 'air' sound ....

If you or anyone is able to explain to me how to read or hear so i can better write would be much appreciated.
If you do not know what words or syllables you stress in speaking, then there is no way to 'teach' that. You must read a lot of metric poetry (Shakespeare alone has more than 150 sonnets at your disposal) and listen to the rhythm of native speech in conversation and on the media. With time, you will gain a natural rhythm yourself.