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When did the Arabs stop being Semites?

Non-sequitur! "Anti-Semitic" never means "anti-Arab". And besides, the Arabs would hate to hear that it might.

Equally amusing is that between 1924 and 1948 the word "Palestinians" usually referred to Jews living in, well, Palestine. The Arab population there were called Arabs. Palestinian Arabs didn't become a distinctive group until later. I guess getting chased out of your homes will do that to you.
It just underlines how much language reflects culture, history etc.

Berko
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}> ...
}> } As a long-time resident in Mrs. Donovan's flaunted killfile, the }> } undersigned AUEer mentioned by her only as a nameless "quarter," etc., }> } knows that she meant sense 4, being discriminatory. Mrs. Donovan }> } discriminates against anyone who has the courage to stand up to Big }> } Mama, AUE's famed "Queen Cobra."
}
}> Anyone?
}
} Yes.
Oh, maybe you mean be impolite to her. I thought you meant disagree with her on a point of English usage. Please forgive me.

R. J. Valentine
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Again, my words there are not complaint. Pinter's words were, ... to see the same kind of eloquence from a Bushee.

The usage of "eloquence" in this context is square-peggish. Eloquence is 1 : discourse marked by force and persuasiveness; also ... to write "I have yet to see a Bushee write as eloquently as this." (Although I wouldn't say that) Comments?

I've always made the same assumption (eloquence/eloquent). As someone who feels pure disgust for the actions of Bush/Blair/Howard over Iraq, I don't find Pinter's remarks all that eloquent. Certainly they're concise and convey something of the stereotypic upper class Brit, but they're not particularly forceful and reveal no particular ethical flaw in the actions of Blair and Bush. There are assertions of criminal behaviour, but that's all they are. One need not be eloquent to assert things.
Berko
}> ... }> } As a long-time resident in Mrs. Donovan's flaunted killfile, the }> } undersigned AUEer mentioned by ... up to Big Mama, AUE's famed "Queen Cobra." }> Anyone? } Yes. Oh, maybe you mean be impolite to her.

No, I mean and meant "to stand up to."
I thought you meant disagree with her on a point of English usage. Please forgive me.

No problem.

Reinhold (Rey) Aman
The usage of "eloquence" in this context is square-peggish. Eloquence ... as eloquently as this." (Although I wouldn't say that) Comments?

I've always made the same assumption (eloquence/eloquent). As someone who feels pure disgust for the actions of Bush/Blair/Howard over Iraq, ... There are assertions of criminal behaviour, but that's all they are. One need not be eloquent to assert things. Berko

I know what you mean. I read somewhere a quote attributed to McLuhan (and applied by someoen to the situation in Northern Ireland) which asserted:
"if you're not confused, you don't understand the problem". (thanks Teddy Snips for your reminder)
While I do not vouch for the claim itself, it seems to me this is eloquent as it concisely summarises what many people feel about "the troubles" and does so by uttering an apparent paradox, (which underlines the substantive point being made).
Similarly, I read in a feminist digest recently someone who said that "when God made man, she was only joking". Eloquent, even if I disagree.
Chrissy
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I know what you mean. I read somewhere a quote attributed to McLuhan (and applied by someoen to the situation in Northern Ireland) which asserted: "if you're not confused, you don't understand the problem". (thanks Teddy Snips for your reminder)

In NI usually taking the form 'Anyone who isn't confused obviously doesn't understand what's going on'
An admirable summation of the views expressed about the recent election where the DUP insist the vote means the end of the Good Friday agreement, Sinn Fein insists it means the continuance of the agreement in a more acceptable form and the British Minister concerned insists that the majority of people in the province have signalled their approval of the whole process.
To Neils Bohr is attributed:
'You have not studied quantum mechanics well if you aren't confused by it.'
John Dean
Oxford
De-frag to reply
I know what you mean. I read somewhere a quote ... don't understand the problem". (thanks Teddy Snips for your reminder)

In NI usually taking the form 'Anyone who isn't confused obviously doesn't understand what's going on'

That may be an imperfectly remembered descendant of the following, which was in circulation about fifty years ago:

If you can keep your head when those around you are losing theirs, maybe you just don't understand the situation.
In NI usually taking the form 'Anyone who isn't confused obviously doesn't understand what's going on'

That may be an imperfectly remembered descendant of the following, which was in circulation about fifty years ago: If you can keep your head when those around you are losing theirs, maybe you just don't understand the situation.

Nigel Rees, an authority on quotations, gives the Northern Ireland version as John did above:
"Anyone who isn't confused here doesn't really understand what's going on." Belfast citizen, 1970.
And, for completeness, he follows it with:
"Ah well, they say it's not as bad as they say it is." Southern Irish woman on the situation in Ulster.

Matti
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That may be an imperfectly remembered descendant of the following, ... are losing theirs, maybe you just don't understand the situation.

Nigel Rees, an authority on quotations, gives the Northern Ireland version as John did above: "Anyone who isn't confused here doesn't really understand what's going on." Belfast citizen, 1970.

Yeah, 1970. That's roughly one generation after my "fifty years ago."
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