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What form of question would we call that? Is it by any chance a troll?
Bull, or Irish bull. A statement containing an incongruity or ... The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition

(snip examples)
"I wouldn't be a member of any club who'd have me as a member" (Groucho Marx?)

"Please accept my resignation. I don’t care to belong to any club that will have me as a member.
"ATTRIBUTION: Groucho Marx (1895–1977), U.S. comic actor. Quoted in Arthur Sheekman, The Groucho Letters, introduction (1967).

"Letter to Hollywood’s Friar’s Club."
According to .

HIBT, too?

Jerry Friedman
"I wouldn't be a member of any club who'd have me as a member" (Groucho Marx?)

The Columbia Book of Quotations, available at Bartleby.com, quotes a letter purporting to be from Groucho: "Please accept my resignation. I don’t care to belong to any club that will have me as a member."
That is not an absurdity, it is an accurate criticism of clubs. It is somewhat in the line of a ... in the mid 1950's. "Let's all us guys who are loners and individualists get together to work out our problems."

The Procrastinator's Club is still trying to schedule an organizational meeting.

Bob Lieblich
Hoping to be a charter member
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
"I wouldn't be a member of any club who'd have me as a member" (Groucho Marx?)

That is not an absurdity, it is an accurate criticism of clubs. It is somewhat in the line of a ... the mid 1950's. "Let's all us guys who are loners and individualists get together to work out our problems." S&

I think I see the nuance. It's possible to decline membership whenver it's offered (although it's just a complex way of saying that you'll never coose to become a member) whereas in your case the terms exclude the action.
That scene in Life of Brian when Brian says
"... you don't need anybody. You're all individuals."

and the crowd repeats back in unison
"we are all individuals", only for individual to declare "I'm not!"

is probably more like my original example. If Brian is right, then they are all entitled to repeat it, although doing so in unison tends to subvert the premise, while the exception "I'm not" endorses the premise by denying it.
I liked your example.
PE
This definition would imply that it doesn't have to be ... won't come to yours. Yogi Berra, baseball player (1925 )

If Thomas Jefferson was alive today, he'd be turning over in his grave.

If Elvis were alive today, he'd be knocking on the lid.

Peter Moylan (Email Removed) http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)
That is not an absurdity, it is an accurate criticism ... student bulletin board at Pratt institute in the mid 1950's.

Shouldn't it be "the Pratt Institute"? Straight question. Someone check the website.

When I was there, we referred to it as merely "Pratt", whatever the formalities. Nobody seemed confused or offended.
S&
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
The Columbia Book of Quotations, available at Bartleby.com, quotes a letter purporting to be from Groucho: "Please accept my resignation. I don’t care to belong to any club that will have me as a member."

I'm pretty sure that I remember him telling the story in his autobiography, Groucho and Me , so I'd guess that it's he who did the purporting.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >It is error alone which needs the
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >support of government. Truth canPalo Alto, CA 94304 >stand by itself.

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Shouldn't it be "the Pratt Institute"? Straight question. Someone check the website.

When I was there, we referred to it as merely "Pratt", whatever the formalities. Nobody seemed confused or offended.

Sure, it's still called "Pratt" today. But it's not called "Pratt Institute" without the "the", is it? TWIA.
When I was there, we referred to it as merely "Pratt", whatever the formalities. Nobody seemed confused or offended.

Sure, it's still called "Pratt" today. But it's not called "Pratt Institute" without the "the", is it? TWIA.

I went to the Pratt home page and it continually refers to the place as merely "Pratt" and the headings on the links all use "Pratt Institute" without the "The". You might use your computer and Google to make a more thorough search but so far, the "The" does not seem to be in use.
S&
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Sure, it's still called "Pratt" today. But it's not called "Pratt Institute" without the "the", is it? TWIA.

I went to the Pratt home page and it continually refers to the place as merely "Pratt" and the headings ... and Google to make a more thorough search but so far, the "The" does not seem to be in use.

I did a Google search restricted to pratt.edu. There seems to be inconsistency. For example:
"to pratt institute" 77
"to the pratt institute" 130
"at pratt institute" 176
"at the pratt institute" 6
"the pratt institute is" 2
"pratt institute is" 33
Make of that what you will. I suspect, though, that the farther back in time you go, the more likely that "the" will be there.
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