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Andrea polled the class to see who wanted to have bake sale to raise money for their trip.

... asked ... cookie sale ...

Hi,

Does the second version sound right and mean about the same as the first in the above? Thanks.
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AngliholicAndrea polled the class to see who wanted to have bake sale to raise money for their trip.

... asked ... cookie sale ...

Hi,

Does the second version sound right and mean about the same as the first in the above? Thanks.
"polled/asked" mean approximately the same thing, although "polling" tends to be thought of as a more formal process than "asking". For example, in a poll you would expect the answers to be written down, the percentage of responses for and against announced, etc.

I've never heard of anyone holding a "cookie sale" the term is always "bake sale" even if only cookies are on sale.
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Hi,

Andrea asked the class Perhaps she just spoke to them as a group. 'Good morning, class. Do you want to . . . '

Andrea polled the class Sounds like she asked each individual student for his/her answer.

Best wishes, Clive
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Comments  
Thanks, Ray.

Would you shed a little more light on "bake sale?" Is it always for money-raising?
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 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.