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Hello everyone !

I'm Nicoleta from Romania and first ui want to congratulate all those who participate and make this a wonderful site!!:)

I was translating a Geopgraphy paper in to English from Romanian and i came acroos a problem regarding the adverbs of position.
I don't know which is best to say. central westen part? or centralwest part? or the central west part?
How about if it were with position and not part: the central western position? or the centre west position? or the central west position?

Thank you in advance and have a wonderful weekend!:)
Nicoleta
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Hello Ineffable

Welcome to Englishforum.com. I myself am an English learner (I am a Japanese). But if you don't mind, let me try to answer your question. You can be sure you can get better answers from out teachers (moderators).

"Hunedoara is located in the central western part of Romania". Here "central western part" is more natual than "central west part" or "centralwest part".

I don't think "position" is an adequate word to mean a geographic location.

paco
Nicoleta,

The first thing that came to mind for me was the American airline, "North Central".
I'd say "the west central part".

By the way, there are no adverbs here. "west" and "central" are adjectives.

CJ
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For the sake of clarity and to avoid ambiguity I would write, "XXX is in the central part of western YYY."
... and I'd get rid of the parts and portions: 'It's in west central Romania'.
I guess "central western part" is not a wrong expression though its usage might be rare compared with "west-central part" (I believe "west-central" is a single word and "west" and "central" should be hyphnated at least in formal writings). One of the grounds why I guess so is that OED uses this expression in explaining some words. Examples are : "The snow-on-the-mountain is a plant native to the central southern United States". "The pointing bone sorcery is widely distributed throughout southern and central northern Australia". OED uses also an expression "central north". "Gondowana is the name of a region in central north India".

I am wondering if there is any semantic difference between "north-central", "central northern", and "central north".

paco
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It's all rather ambiguous, isn't it, Paco?
If something is west and central, one thinks it's on the west side and neither north nor south but between the north side and the south side (of a country or whatever). If it's north and central, one thinks it's on the north side and neither east nor west but between the east side and the west side. Is the "central" always applied to the perpendicular directionality? Is "central" on its own really "central (north-south) central (east-west)"? It's a puzzle. Emotion: smile
Jim
Enjoy the scenic views on the Glacial Ridge Trail in NorthCentral/Western Minnesota. Yeh.
A single guideline sentence from the anthropological style guide is all that Mr. Google yielded me:

'Use open compounds for directional adjectives such as "north central" '.
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