+0

From 'Practical English Usage by Michael Swan'


A noun cannot normally have an article or other determiner with it as well as a possessive word. Definite articles are usually dropped when possessive are used.

ex) the car that is John's (=John's car) (Not the John's car or John's the car)


But a possessive word may of course have its own article

ex) the car that is the boss's (= the boss's car)


Q1. What does 'a possessive word' refer to?

Q2. 'the John's car' is incorrect, but why is 'the boss's car' correct?

According to the explanation, the(definite article) + boss's(possessive word) + car(noun) should be incorrect

+0
HoonyQ1. What does 'a possessive word' refer to?

The word that represents the person that "owns" something in the sentence. In the above examples, "John's" and "boss's".

HoonyQ2. 'the John's car' is incorrect, but why is 'the boss's car' correct?

If the item that is "owned" has an article to start with, it loses it. If the person that owns the item has an article in front of it, that article stays. "John" by itself doesn't have an article, so "John's car" has no article. On the other hand, "the boss" has an article, so it remains in "the boss's car".

+0
HoonyA noun cannot normally have an article or other determiner with it as well as a possessive word.

No, the head noun (the noun after the possessive word) cannot normally also have another determiner, but a possessive word can have a determiner if it can have a determiner when it's not possessive.

Examples:

boss can have a determiner when it's not possessive. the boss
So it can have a determiner when it is possessive. the boss's

John cannot have a determiner when it's not possessive. the John
So it can't have a determiner when it is possessive. the John's

CJ